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Heritage Designations

The properties listed below are designated (legally protected) by The Town of Amherstburg under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act. 

The designation bylaw, and additional information for each of these Designated Properties, can be found on the Ontario Heritage Trust website using the property’s address.

Alterations to Designated Properties:

As per section 33 of the Ontario Heritage Act, consent to alterations of the property by the Town of Amherstburg Council is required if the property’s designation bylaw contains a list of heritage attributes, and if the alterations would affect these attributes. Please contact the Town’s Heritage Planner to apply for consent for such alterations or with any questions about alterations requirements. 

Note: Some sites are public (fees may apply) while others are privately owned and not accessible.

275-277 Bathurst Street - Captain Robert Hackett Residence

Description of Property

275-277 Bathurst Street, Amherstburg, Ontario

LT 7 E/S BATHURST ST PL 1 AMHERSTBURG

Known as the “Captain Robert Hackett Residence”

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

Dating from c. 1854-55, the house has physical value as one of the 47 oldest-known buildings in the Town of Amherstburg, making it rare as a type of residential architecture in the town; it’s representative of the type of mid-19th century Amherstburg building stock.

The 1850s were an “Era of Expansion” in Amherstburg; the house was built during this era relating directly to this key theme in the Town’s development.

The house is valued for its association with Captain Robert J. Hackett (c. 1827-1879) a prominent commander of schooners and steamers on the Great Lakes and Detroit River, who built it as his home, and owned it until 1856. This early history of the house recalls Amherstburg’s once-strong maritime activity and identity.

Historically, Amherstburg has been a significant commercial centre in the region, and the c. 1885 addition on the side of the house associates the property to the historic commercial activity of downtown Amherstburg; it was originally the addition was a cabinet, furniture, and framing shop.

The property contributes to the concentration of historic resources on the street as one of 10 19th century houses on the block; it helps define the mixed residential and commercial heritage character of the area. The property is physically, functionally and visually linked to its surroundings being compatible in scale, form, massing, use and age. 

Heritage Attributes

The primary heritage attributes (character-defining elements) of the property are:

The c. 1854-55 house and c.1885 addition:

  • Original location and placement of the house on Bathurst Street;
  • The c. 1854-55 portion of the house and its one-and-one-half-storey rectangular form with front-facing    gable roof; the c. 1885, north addition of the house with its one-storey rectangular form;
  • Wood-frame construction and facades and masonry base;
  • Fenestration and doorways, including later enclosed verandah window assemblies;
  • The interior main staircase with its high-style, wood newel post and balustrades.

Built prior to 1861.

225 Brock Street - St. John the Baptist Roman Catholic Church*

Description of Property

St. John the Baptist Parish is a two-storey stone-bricked church with a rectangular floor plan and additional rear wing, located on the East side of Brock Street.

  • Building Name: St. John the Baptist Parish
  • Street Location: 225 Brock St.
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: William Burnell, Contractor
  • Original Owner: Diocese of Toronto
  • Present Use: Place of Worship
  • Date of Construction: 1844

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

St. John the Baptist Parish can be traced back to 1728. After the original church burnt down in 1843, the church was rebuilt under the organization of Father Boue. St. John the Baptist holds cultural heritage value because it was one of the first churches in Ontario, having been crafted in the 1844 and modeled after Cathedral du Puy in France.  It was one of the only Roman Catholic churches along the Detroit River between Sandwich and Lake Erie, and thus, served people from River Canard, McGregor, and Harrow. 

St. John the Baptist Church is an important part of Amherstburg’s cultural heritage. Religion was a vital part of early Amherstburg settlers and religious buildings make up an equally prominent component of Amherstburg’s landscape. St John the Baptist Parish can be considered a landmark due to its architectural significance within the Amherstburg area. The church’s prominence is a testimony of the riches of the architecture of the town. St. John the Baptist Parish showcases the fine craftsmanship of their traditional bell tower, created in 1863. The two bells at use in the tower were gifted to the church in 1848. Through the building's one hundred and fifty-three years of existence there have been some major repairs and minor alterations but the exterior of St. John the Baptist Church is much the same as it was when the Golden Jubilee was celebrated over one hundred years ago. Much of the church’s original structure remains intact.

Heritage Attributes

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of St. John the Baptist Parish include:

  • Innate Gothic stained glass windows imported from Belgium in 1882, 1894, and the early 1900s.
  • Stone bricks from local rocks
  • The prominent sitting of St. John the Baptist Parish on the lot
  • Sanctuary ceilings
  • Innate stonework around narthex windows
  • Single prominent bell tower with louvers, rosette, and spire
  • Two traditional bells within the bell tower
  • Footing detail along corners
  • Stone window sills
  • Detailed wooden transom above windows
  • Wood rosette detailed insert in tower façade
  • Buttresses on each corner of façade
  • High gable roof 

247 Brock Street - St. Anthony School

Description of Property

Built in 1910-1911 with an addition in 1929-1930. St. Anthony's was closed in 1972. The House of Shalom opened in 1974 and served the community from this location until 2020. 

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

Built 1910-11, and expanded in 1929, the building has design value unique as a substantial and important example of Romanesque Revival-style architecture in the Town of Amherstburg; Classical Revival-style elements also distinguish the building.

The building also has physical value being unique for its extensive use of local limestone, which was not a commonly used building material in the Town despite being a local material. It is one of only a small number of limestone buildings in the town, and among the most substantial.

Originally St. Anthony School, the property has historical value in the community as an important and integral educational institution. From 1912 to 1972 the building was a hub of educational activity, serving as a Roman Catholic Separate School, initially to serve lower grades. 

The property has contextual value being historically and visually linked to its surroundings adjacent to St. John the Baptist Roman Catholic church. With the church building, the property recalls the significant historical presence of the Roman Catholic Church in the town.

With the school building’s prominent and distinctive physical presence on a corner lot visually linked to the adjacent church, the building stands out in an otherwise residential neighbourhood.

Heritage Attributes

The primary exterior heritage attributes (character-defining elements) of the property are its:

Exterior:

  • Original location and placement on Brock Street, adjacent to St. John the Baptist Roman Catholic church;
  • Rectangular, two-storey form on a raised basement;
  • Hipped primary roof; gabled (pedimented) frontispiece; metal roofline cornices; secondary metal cornices atop doorways; exterior stone chimney;
  • Masonry construction and limestone facades with sandstone detailing; the limestone main exterior stairs;
  • Fenestration, symmetrical in arrangement; wooden sash windows; single and double doorways and assemblies with transom lights above.

Interior:

  • two staircases with wood balustrades;
  • interior spacial configuration;
  • wood finishes comprising door and window casings, baseboards, and doors throughout.

4441 Concession 4 South - Honor House

Description of Property

  • Building Name: Henry A.L. & Amelia Honor House
  • Street Location: 4441 Concession 4 South
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: Thomas Lukes          
  • Present Use: Private Residence
  • Date of Construction:1920    

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

The Honor House’s cultural heritage value is unique The Honor House’s cultural heritage value is unique in the association with Thomas Lukes. Mr. Lukes came to Amherstburg in 1875 to work as head sawyer at the Park and Borrowman Planing Mill located on the Old Malden Lunatic Asylum. He built the first new house on Rankin Avenue.  He was a local designer and cabinet maker and also Town Councilor during the late 1800’s to mid 1920’s. Thomas Lukes was an owner of his own furniture making shop, with examples of his finish work including: Wesley United Church 1892, Amherstburg Post Office 1886, Franklin Hough House, Laird Avenue 1918, he also designed and oversaw the building of several homes including the Honor House 1920.

Heritage Attributes

The Henry A.L. & Amelia Honor House is a unique example of prairie/craftsman American Foursquare and an example of early 20th Century modern architecture in Amherstburg. 

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of the Honor House include:

Early 20th Century modern architecture in a classic Arts & Crafts style residence

  • Thomas Lukes, in 1920, designed and constructed the residence based on the prairie and craftsman style with emphasis on use of natural materials
  • Low profile broad roof, linear emphasis
  • The style is a modified four square with horizontal banding created thru the use of combed brick, deep grout lines, continuous eve lines, banding of the windows, horizontal roof ridge
  • Presently well preserved existing field stone, combed brick, original concrete, local native red oak and Georgian pine
  • Deep verandah, spanning ¾ of front face and side of residence
  • Large front windows trimmed in local native red oak and pine in the linear style windows grouped together adding to the vertical contrast of the landing

7860 County Road 20 - Methodist Church*

Description of Property

  • Building Name: Methodist Church                            
  • Street Location: County Rd. 20                                  
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: Unknown                              
  • Present Use: Accommodations                                  
  • Date of Construction: 2001-22 

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

On Saturday February 27th, 1892 there was a historic meeting of the quarterly official board of the Amherstburg Circuit Member of the Methodist church to appoint a board of trustees to hold property and build a Methodist church in the 7th concession of the Township of Malden. 

On Monday evening, August 15th 1892, a dedication tea party was held. On June 10th, 1925 the Methodist church became the Malden United Church at the purchase price of $1.00 from a previous date of April 8th 1925. In 1925, a large circular stained glass window “Christ in Gethsemane” was installed in the front of the church. It was adopted from a painting from Hoffman and carried to in deep blues, browns, ambers, and reds. It was the work of Sergio DePaoli of Windsor who spent two months devoted to creating this 50” diameter window. 

In 1955, after Highway 18 was completed, the church was found to be just barely off the road allowance, with the steps being on the highway allowance. A mover by the name of Mr. Renaud moved the church back 125’ from the centerline of the road, putting it on a 11 block basement. A sump pump, electric pump, inside toilet, kitchen sink, and cistern tank were then installed. The outside wall was tarred, filled with blocks and mortar. A new chimney was built and tile was laid around the church. The highway department paid $7,500 to cover these expenses. 

Poor attendance forced the congregation to officially amalgamate with the HarrowUnitedChurch on January 1, 1979. Thus the St. John the Baptist Parish of the London Diocese purchased the building and it became known as St. Theresa of the Little Flower Chapel purchased the property in 1978.

The St. Theresa Chapel had it’s last service on June 25th, 1995. Slated for demolition, an adhoc committee, known as the Malden Museum and Cultural Council was formed by a group of concerned citizens. The property was purchased from the Diocese as to be a part of the local community of Malden and Amherstburg with a mandate to uphold Christian values. Renovations by members at this time included a new emergency stairwell, new air-conditioning/furnace, and fresh painting of the whole interior. Activities and events began to occur and the official grand opening was held on November 15th, 1998.   

Heritage Attributes

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of the MethodistChurch include:

  • Typical of a modest country church of the second half of the 19th century
  • Basic cross gable design
  • Original wood clapboard now covered with white aluminium siding.
  • Sanctuary windows, gothic arch tops with double hung lower portion
  • Arched portion of sanctuary windows have checker-pattern stained glass motif.
  • Central solid wood door topped with gothic arch window with small diamond-design motif, flanked by two additional gothic windows.
  • Cement stairwell leading to entrance, added in 1955
  • Steep gable roof with two sanctuary windows gothic arch tops with double hung lowers
  • As well, an additional shed roof covering a stairwell leading to the basement was also added in 1955, showcasing 3 double hung windows on the basement level
  • Round window upper portion of sanctuary
  • During renovations in 1955, a lower level hipped roof kitchen extension with two double hung rectangular windows and bathroom window interior was added
  • Three foot vertical wainscot treatment on all walls, moulded banisters, and moulded basket handle arch to front sanctuary

6790 County Road 50 - Lewis Arner Homestead*

Description of Property

  • Building Name: Lewis Arner Homestead
  • Street Location: 6790 County Road 50
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: Milles Patten
  • Original Owner: Lewis and Margaret Arner
  • Present Use: Private Residence
  • Date of Construction:1888 

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

The Lewis Arner house’s heritage value lies in it being an example of “Carpenter Gothic” Victorian architecture as can be seen in the architectural details at the verge boards, window brackets and gable shape. The building remains in its original form. This building was constructed in 1888 by Miles Patten. 

The homestead’s cultural heritage value lies in its association with its original owner Lewis Arner, a successful farmer from a well known Essex County family.

Heritage Attributes

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of the Lewis Arner Homestead include:

  •  The prominent sitting of the house on the lot.
  • The decorative wooden ornaments typical to the Carpenter Gothic Style
  • Bracketed cornice surrounding the front entry

7143 County Road 50 - John Bratt House

Description of Property

  • Building Name: John Bratt House
  • Street Location: 7143 Essex Road 50
  • Legal Description: Concession 7, Pt. Lot 59, RP 12R1265, Pt. 1
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Town of Amherstburg
  • Builder: George and Charles Bratt
  • Original Owner: John Bratt  
  • Original Use: Private Residence
  • Present Use: Private Residence
  • Date of Construction: 1877

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

 

Heritage Attributes

7143 Essex Road 50 was constructed in 1877 by George and Charles Bratt for John Bratt.

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of the house include:

 Victorian design, with American common bond brickwork

  • Brick soldier-mount foundation of limestone perimeter
  • Original front entrance with stained glass transom and lead side windows
  • Stone lintels
  • Gothic gable
  • Victorian Second Empire round windows at front and side gables

214 Dalhousie Street - Park House*

Description of Property

  • Building Name: Park House Museum   
  • Street Location: Dalhousie Street                                                                                                           
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: Leith, Shepard, and Duff    
  • Original Owner: Leith, Shepard, and Duff
  • Present Use: Museum                                
  • Date of Construction: 1799 

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

The Park House has a most romantic oral tradition. It is said to have been built at the mouth of the rouge River in Detroit by a family of Loyalists. When Detroit was ceded to the Americans in 1796 the owners crossed the river to the new British post at Malden. On receiving a land grant in 1798, they dismantled their River Rouge home and towed it downriver by canoe to be reassembled on Lot 17, the west side of First Street in the new town of Amherstburg. A feat of loyalty indeed! This story first appears in print in 1881 in the "Illustrated Historical Atlas of the Counties of Essex and Kent". Unfortunately, to date, there is no documentary evidence to support the claim.

Mystery also shrouds the first owners of Lot 17. In 1798 a draw was held for the lots on First Street (now Dalhousie Street). Lot 17 went to the mercantile firm of Leith, Shepherd & Duff. The National Archive records show that by August 17, 1798 the house stood upon lot 17.

On July 6th, 1804, Alexander Mackintosh registered the lot in his name. A military plan of Amherstburg was drawn up, showing for the first time a building on the lot in the position where we know the house stood, and an evaluation of the "Storehouse, House and Wharff " on Lot 17.

The Mackintosh family pursued the acquisition of the property and in 1807 Angus, Alexander's father, bought William Mills' share for £800 New York currency. It was another ten years before the purchase was completed. On July 15, 1817 Alexander acquired both his father's and the New North West company's interests in the lot and premises. After all this struggle, Alexander only retained the property until 1823, when Angus became chieftain of the Mackintosh clan.

The first glimpse of the house is found in Margaret Reynolds' painting, "A View of Amherstburg, 1813", seen from Elliott's Point. It is interesting to note how many outbuildings had sprung up in a reasonably short time.

Jean Baptiste Macon was a well-established merchant in Amherstburg when he bought the property on August 23, 1823, paying Alexander Mackintosh £500 for the prime spot. From 1819 to 1823Macon had been in partnership with William and Charles Bercsy on the east side of Dalhousie Street and was now prosperous enough to strike out on his own. He ran a busy forwarding business which employed many workers. Among his clerks were the Park brothers who would later buy the property. During his tenure Macon also served a term of four years as a member of the Legislative Assembly, representing Essex County, along with William Elliott.

Thomas F. Park of Park and Company bought the house on September 23, 1839. He placed his youngest brother, Theodore Jones Park, in charge of the new premises and together with brother John R. Park, they ran a general merchandising and forwarding business out of Amherstburg and Colchester. This was the beginning of the long association of the Park family with the house. The Park brothers were astute businessmen and were involved in numerous business ventures together and with other partners. The shipping aspect of their business expanded quickly and by 1860, they had ships plying the Great Lakes, journeying to Montreal and even crossing the Atlantic Ocean to England.

Thomas Park died in 1864 and Theodore purchased the house two years later. The name "Park House" was first applied to the large hotel built by Theodore Park in 1876-77 on the northwest corner of Dalhousie and Murray Streets (the present site of the Gordon House). The hotel only retained this name for a brief time as it was sold by auction on September 2, 1884, shortly after Theodore's death and was renamed the Lake View Hotel by its new owners, the Fox family.

Dr. T. James Park, the oldest of Theodore's six children, set up a medical office in the family home in 1880 using the north end of the building for his office and waiting room. "Dr. Jim" worked until his death on January 1, 1936. His youngest sister Lizzie outlived him and her death in January, 1941 brought an end to an era. The Park family had owned the house longer than any other proprietor, living and working there for 102 years.

The long ownership by the Parks was followed by a great deal of change. Shortly before her death, with no immediate relatives to whom the property might be willed, Lizzie Park conveyed the land to "Helen Donovan, spinster, of New York State". After Miss Park’s death, Miss Donovan conveyed the land to Geraldine S. Sterns of Detroit on October 15, 1941, she in turn sold the property to C.R. Lalonde in August, 1945. During this uncertain period the house had many tenants. After purchasing the property the Lalondes continued to rent out the north end of the house.

Mr. and Mrs. Lalonde carried out extensive renovations and opened an antique store in part of the house. In keeping with its past, they named it "Park House Antiques". Many people still have fond memories of buying a treasured object there during the store's 25 year life span.

In November, 1970, the Lalondes sold the property to Zarko and Bessie Vucinic, owners of Duffy’s Tavern situated on the adjacent lot to the south. The Vucinics planned to develop the river frontage and by the spring of 1971 wished the house to be removed in order to extend the business. Greenfield Village in Dearborn, Michigan was approached but local opinion was against moving the house there. In January, 1972, Mr. Vucinic advised the community that the house – thought to be the oldest within a 250 mile radius – would be disposed of after March 15th of that year. This announcement was the catalyst that set in motion a movement to save the house.

At this time the Amherstburg Rotary Club formed a committee with the intent to arrange an option to purchase the Park House, move it to another site and operate it as a community museum. In late January, 1972 with the assistance of Amherstburg Town Council, it was decided to relocate the house to the northeast section of the former Waterworks Park, opposite the west end of Rankin Avenue. The Rotary Club appointed a special committee to orchestrate the moving and restoration. Funding for the task came from many sources, the largest contributor being the Ontario Department of Tourism.

On April 7, 1972, the delicate task of moving the Park House began with the digging out of the new basement. This, however, was not accomplished without incident. With the foundation cavity nearly complete an old water main was pierced by the shovel, flooding the hole and causing panic. Fortunately the damage was minimal and the preparations continued without any further major delays. Less than one month later, on May 3, 1972, the house rolled down Dalhousie Street toward its future home.

In July, 1973, the Amherstburg Historic Sites Association was formed. The first order of business was to form a Furnishing Committee to acquire the necessary artefacts to open the house as a museum. By the end of the year the kitchen was ready for public inspection. On December 9, 1973, the Park House Museum was officially opened by Mayor H. Murray Smith to crowds of enthusiastic visitors.

Today the Park House is a year-round museum catering to the needs of visiting school children, seniors and the general public. As well as being an interesting and informative place to visit, the Park House Museum also fills the function of Amherstburg’s community museum, storing and displaying items of interest and importance to the area. In 1978, the Park House branched out into another historically related area: tinsmithing. The Park House Tinsmiths began producing tinware (made by volunteers) for sale to the public in 1978. Since that date the business has grown in size and reputation. It now has an active volunteer membership. Park House tinware can be seen at museums and historic sites all over Canada and the United States and is even shipped to the United Kingdom!

During the past two centuries the Park House has seen many changes in surroundings, structure, use and tenants and has survived with integrity. Hopefully, the Park House Museum will survive the challenges of the next two hundred years, as successfully. It is speculated the house was used as a combination store and residence for many years. Today the Park House is a year round museum catering to the needs of visiting school children, seniors and the general public, as well as being an interesting and informative place to visit. Set Programs are available and custom tours can be arranged for special interest groups. During the summer months the pensioner's cottage, another Amherstburg Heritage Property, is open to the public where tinsmithing is demonstrated. Park House is estimated to be the oldest house within 250 miles of the Town of Amherstburg. 

Heritage Attributes

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of Park House include:

  • Early example of solid log construction known as Pièce sur Pièce log construction, a French timber frame construction method
  • Wood frame used was Tulip wood which grows abundantly in the Rouge River
  • Georgian influence
  • Original house had clapboard siding painted white
  • Cedar shake roof
  • Bricked chimney on each side of house
  • Central hall design
  • Unique rectangular glass transom

 

Today, the Park House is a museum that depicts the social history of Amherstburg and surrounding area.

Public - fee may apply.

www.parkhousemuseum.com

The Park House Museum Facebook Page

214 Dalhousie Street - Pensioners Cottage*

Description of Property

  • Building Name: Pensioners Cottage
  • Street Location: 214 Dalhousie St.
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: British Army
  • Original Owner: Matthew Pollard
  • Present Use: Museum
  • Date of Construction: 1852

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

Upon retirement from the British Army, the Army provided pensioners with 4 room cottages for their residences. 88 cottages were built around the Amherstburg area and occupied by British Army Pensioners. In particular, Pensioner’s Cottage belonged to Matthew Pollard and originally sat on Lot 30 on Fort Street on the south side of the road. 87 of the cottages were built in the same fashion with the same housing layout, with the exception of one created for a prominent Sergeant Major.

 Shortly after the formation of the group in 1973, the Amherstburg Historic Sites Association became heavily involved in the Pensioner’s Cottage restoration. The cottage was separated from the front of the former A.B Lukes property and donated by Peter DiPasquale who recognized its historical value. Today very few cottages remain and Pensioner’s cottage acts as the tin and printsmith shop behind ParkHouseMuseum, another designated Amherstburg heritage property. The only other restored cottage other than King’s Navy Yard Park Pensioners Cottage is located on display on the grounds of FortMalden. Pensioner’s cottage acts as an exquisite example of some of the first government housing initiatives in Canada. 

Heritage Attributes

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of Pensioner’s Cottage include:

  • Plaster concrete foundation
  • Solid wood front and back doors with vertical boards with simple flat casings
  • 4 double hung windows with sash
  • Small chimney resting on the interior bracket on west end of the building
  • Gable roof
  • 6” cedar clapboard painted white

 

By mid 1840's, the importance of Fort Malden had dwindled and the British Government no longer wanted the expense of maintaining a regular garrison there. Earl Gray, the Colonial Secretary enrolled pensioners in the British army. These pensioners would not only serve as a military presence to maintain the posts and provide security where needed, but they and their families would also contribute to the settlement of the colony and the local economy.

On July 4, 1851, eighty two Pensioners with their wives and children arrived at Fort Malden aboard the steamer Hope! They took up temporary quarters in the barracks until their single-story, wood frame cottage of approximately 18 x 22 feet. The cottage consisted of a combined living room/kitchen with a stove for heating and cooking, and one or two small bedrooms.

The Pensioners Cottage is part of the Park House Museum.

Public - fee may apply

224 Dalhousie Street - Commissariat (Walter Callam Residence)*

Description of Property

The Callam Residence, also known as the Commissariat, a rectangular, brick bungalow with a low, hipped roof and prominent end chimneys. The building faces the DetroitRiver and is located in the heart of King's NavyYardPark at FortMalden, National Historic Site. The designation is confined to the footprint of the building.

  • Building Name: Callam Residence/ Commissariat
  • Street Location: 224 Dalhousie
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Original Owner: General Callam  
  • Present Use: Museum
  • Date of Construction: 1832 

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

The structure was inhabited by 3 generations of the Callam family, originally constructed as a British Army facility. Built in 1831, the Commissariat functioned as the FortMalden office in charge of purchasing flour, beef, straw, firewood and other staples for the garrison from local contractors. The Commissariat Department also managed the pay and finances of FortMalden. Today, the Commissariat is one of the only two remaining military buildings in the Town of Amherstburg and it is an integral part of the original FortMalden complex, a designated national historic site. The Commissariat also sits within the Navy Yard Park, an Amherstburg Heritage Designation property. Although it functioned as a private residence since the latter 1800's, it was purchased by Parks Canada in 1983, and restored to its original appearance. The Provincial Marine received a grant in 2002 for 2 years from the Trillium Foundation to rent the building, and operate it as a headquarters and interpretive centre for the Life and Times of Provincial Marine sailors and their families.


The Callam Residence offers historical, architectural, and environmental value to Amherstburg. The Commissariat Office strongly illustrates the presence of the military in the former reserve area near the center of Amherstburg. As well, the Commissariat Office administered local service contracts to the military and also relates to the economic development of Amherstburg from 1830-1850. The Commissariat Office is a very good example of the standardized bungalow constructed by the British military during the 1830s. It is characterized by its symmetrical compact form and domestic scale. The building's competent workmanship is evidenced in the handling of the brickwork, in particular the keywork above the windows and the detailing around the entrance. In addition, the Commissariat Office reinforces the present character of its fort setting. As part of a national and local landmark at Fort Malden National Historic Site, it is a familiar community building.

Heritage Attributes

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of the Commissariat include:

  • Standardized bungalow design, and good craftsmanship
  • Symmetrical massing and compact form of the well proportioned bungalow design consisting of a rectangular, one-storey structure with a low hipped roof and prominent end chimneys.
  • Design of the principle, five-bay façade, with its centre door and fan light and paired twelve-over-twelve sash windows.
  • Masonry work including the rubble stone foundations, the brick walls and chimneys, and the dressed-stone ledges and front steps.
  • Simple decorative details such as the iron work.
  • Surviving interior finishes including the wood plank flooring, interior trims and plasterwork.
  • Domestic design and materials which are a focal point at the historic site and which complement the fort setting.
  • Visibility and historical association with Fort Malden National Historic Site which makes it familiar within the area. 

This building originally functioned as an office for Fort Malden. The structure serves as an example of the standardized bungalow, a construction style implemented by the British military during the 1830s.

Today, the Provincial Marine Re-Enactment Unit opens up the Commissariat's doors to the public frequently.

 

242 Dalhousie Street - King's Navy Yard Park*

Description of Property

  • Building Name: Kings Navy Yard Park                    
  • Street Location: Dalhousie Street
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Ownership: Town of Amherstburg
  • Present Use: Public Park
  • Date of Construction: 1972

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

The Town of Amherstburg is situated on the Detroit River approximately 4 miles North of Lake Erie and approximately 18 miles south of Windsor. At one time the Town was the largest urban centre in Essex County and historically dates back to the year 1784 when the Huron and the Ottawa Indians gave by treaty, a 7 mile square tract of land at the mouth of the Detroit River to a group of nine British Officers and men who had been associated with them during the American War of Independence. 

In the early years the predominant made structures were the fortifications of First Malden which was originally called Fort Amherstburg. Included in the military post was the Kings Navy Yard with formed an integral part of the military installation and at which the construction of a significant number of ships for the Provincial Marine Service of the Upper Great Lakes was completed. Many of these ships played a role in the battle of Lake Erie fought against the forces of Commander Perry of the United States Navy in the War of 1812. Additional historical notes concerning the Kings Navy Yard includes the fact that the first buildings built as part of the military reserve in 1796 were located on this site. The Yard formed the headquarters for the Provincial Marine and acted as a depot for the naval activity of the British in the Great Lakes. In 1813, the British burnt the depot and fled to return in 1815 when they constructed a storage building, they built an office building and yard continued in military service until approximately 1858 when the military withdrew from the fort. Eventually the land became the property of the Town of Amherstburg. 

In 1972, the Park House which had been purchased by the Amherstburg Rotary Club, was moved to the Kings Navy Yard becoming a segment of the park itself. This move aided in conservation of the historic heritage that the Navy Yard Park has played such an important role in. 

Heritage Attributes

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of the Navy Yard Park include:

  • The prominence of the vegetation within the park
  • Proximity of the park to water
  • Views and vistas of the Detroit River

Designated as a Bi-Centennial International Peace Garden, the King's Navy Yard Park was once a shipyard for the Provincial Marine. Today you can take a stroll along the water, watch freighters pass by or snap a photo of the colourful Rhododendron's and lovely gardens. Be sure to check out the International Peace Sculpture and the Provincial Marine Monument.

Public

252 Dalhousie Street - Salmoni Building*

Description of Property

  • Building Name: Salmoni Building                              
  • Street Location: Dalhousie Street                               
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: Thomas Salmoni                   
  • Original Owner: Thomas Salmoni
  • Present Use: Private Multi                        
  • Date of Construction: 1849

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

Salmoni Building 1849, situated at the south-west intersection of Dalhousie and Richmond Streets. It is a three-storey brick building with a later cut-stone addition on the river (west) side. It stands on the town lot originally occupied by Thomas Reynolds in 1796. (Reynolds headed the Commissary Department first at Detroit then after the evacuation of that place at Amherstburg)

Thomas Salmoni was an Amherstburg merchant and hotel keeper. The Building he erected in 1849 served both as a hotel and a general store. A portion of the third floor was fitted up as a Masonic Lodge Room to accommodate the newly organized Thistle Lodge. Salmoni was a Mason himself. At the river, Salmoni built a dock and erected warehouses to accommodate his forwarding business on the Great Lakes. In 1849 there still remained the tower of a windmill which in 1838 was one of the designated "strong points" chosen by Col. John Prince as suitable for defence of the western frontier in the Patriot troubles. It was actually so-used to give shelter to the militiamen when the Schooner Ann was making its attack on the Amherstburg Waterfront.

There is an old Amherstburg tale to the effect that when Harriet Beecher Stowe was gathering material for her classic, "Uncle Tom's Cabin or Life Among the Lowly" she visited Amherstburg and interviewed various fugitives from slavery at the Salmoni House and incorporated their stories into her account. However, this may better be attributed to a later period after the publication of the book when she did visit the Detroit River area and was entertained as a celebrity by various members and supporters of the Canada Anti-Slavery Society whose Secretary (and actual manager) was Captain Charles Stuart formerly an Amherstburg Magistrate. The abolition of Slavery remained an active public question until the outbreak of the Civil War.

The Salmoni Family were originally from England. An account attributes their coming to America as follows: One of the Salmoni Brothers became a noted boxer and after being a champion in his home land decided to challenge the American boxers so came to the States where a match was arranged. The purse was "winner take all" beside which many private wagers were made. The Salmonis bet heavily on the family representative and when the contest was held and Salmoni was defeated, they were left without funds to return to England, but did have sufficient to make their way to Canada to Montreal, Thomas Salmoni later re-establishing himself came to Amherstburg.

The Salmoni business came to an end with the sudden death of Mark Salmoni, son of Thomas who had succeeded to the business. Michael Twomey and Daniel Henly were later merchants in the premises. They were followed by Emanuel Berube and his nephew Mr. Bedard. The Ira S. Brown Company and Andrew Balla were later proprietors after which the general merchandise format was changed to the "dime store" category.

In subsequent years the building was home to various restaurants and small shops. When the building became vacant and unused, it was demolished with much dismay in 2005 and replaced with luxury condos. The new building was required to keep the historic essence of the old Salmoni Building with similar brick and building plans.

Heritage Attributes

The site of the original Salmoni Building remains a heritage property although the building is a modern condo with a faux heritage facade.

266 Dalhousie Street - Gordon House*

Description of Property

  • Building Name: Gordon House                                  
  • Street Location: Dalhousie Street                               
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: James Gordon                                  
  • Original Owner: James Gordon
  • Present Use: Place of Worship                            
  • Date of Construction: 1804     

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

The Gordon House is situated on lot 18 of the original town plot, as laid out under the orders of Captain Hector McLean. The lot was first issued about 1797, to a George Sharp, who died in 1800, and who apparently had not erected a home on the site prior to his death.

Based on a military plan of 1804, it is almost certain that the present house was constructed during the period of 1800-1804. A watercolour view of Amherstburg, done in 1813 by Margaret Reynolds, clearly shows the present structure on the site. Both the 1804 maps and the 1813 sketch indicate a dock and storage buildings at the river’s edge.

The first known occupant of the house was the Honourable James Gordon, who received a Patent for the lot (replacing the original military grants) in 1821. Gordon came from Scotland as a young man, and went into business as a merchant in Amherstburg. He attached himself to the Militia and was present in most of the engagements in the district in the War of 1812. In 1820, he was made a member of the Executive Council.  

The original town lots fronting on the river were acquired by merchants, who built their house along present day Dalhousie Street, along with warehouses along the river. The Gordon House is the last remaining of the merchants’ establishments located along the river which still stands on its original site. One other, the Park House, also remains but has been relocated some distance from the original site. Only three structures of the pre 1812 period in Amherstburg are known to have survived to this date, the Gordon House being the only one of the three still on its original site. The characteristics of the Gordon House are not represented in any other of the few remaining Amherstburg houses of the early military period. 

Heritage Attributes

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of Gordon House include:

  • Georgian style with a central hall plan
  • Perfectly symmetrical façade with a central dominant door
  • Narrow eaves with a steep roof
  • Timber framing with stone or brick fill, covered with clapboard siding

          

This Georgian style home from the early military period is one of the last remaining merchant houses along the river in Amherstburg.

It was home of the Project H.M.S. Detroit and carried out the activities of promoting and preserving the Town's legacy as a shipbuilding and military community.

Today, it houses the Amherstburg Tourism Department, the Amherstburg Chamber of Commerce, and River Lights.

 

267 Dalhousie Street - Bullock's Tavern*

Description of Property

Bullocks Tavern is a multi unit two-storey building located on the east side of Dalhousie Street.

  • Building Name: Bullocks Tavern       
  • Street Location: 267 – 271 Dalhousie  (Multiple Unit Building)                                                                  
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: Unknown                     
  • Present Use:  Restaurant
  • Date of Construction: Approximately  1830 - 1840

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

Bullocks Tavern is one of the oldest commercial blocks within the Town of Amherstburg. Over the years, the building has housed a variety of Amherstburg businesses. Originally, proprietor George Bullock ran a hotel within the building. During the Rebellion of 1837-38, the building was taken over by the militia and used as the officers’ mess hall. In 1849, the annual banquet of the Amherstburg, Anderdon, and Malden Agriculture Society was held at the location with Bullock as the event host. In 1850, George Bullock was appointed District Treasurer and the businesses was sold. Later on, a shortage of money was discovered within the District accounts Bullock managed and he absconded to the United States. In after years Seth Bullock, a son of George Bullock, became a noted frontier character in the American West and was a friend of Theodore Roosevelt. Still, later, Seth Bullock, assisted Roosevelt in raising the cavalry regiment known as the “Rough Riders” for the service in Cuba in the Spanish-American war. George Bullock and the Bullock Tavern are historical aspects of Amherstburg, linking Amherstburg and its border town location with the history of prominent American people and events. 

In 1850, L.D. Babcock, the owner of Amherstburg-Windsor Stage, purchased the tavern and changed the name to British North American Hotel. In 1866, William Horsman became proprietor and the name was again changed to the White Horse Tavern, however, a decade later, the building was commonly referred to as the “Horsman House.” In May 1902, a new owner, John Fleming once again changed the name to Columbia House. This name was retained until the hotel closed due to wartime prohibition, linking Amherstburg to Canada’s prohibition history. Over the years, Bullocks Tavern has seen many businesses flourish within its walls including a Bank of Commerce, an Eaton’s mail order office, a bookstore, an insurance office, and a florist shop. 

Heritage Attributes

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of Bullock’s Tavern include:

  • Cast lime stone exterior with stucco surfaces with additions build of brick
  • Rectangular floor plan
  • Facade coated in plaster
  • Boxed cornices
  • Wooden trim on windows
  • 3 bay windows flanked by two wooden doors
  • Five bay windows on the upper floor, double hung with stone sills
  • Low hip roof with single brick chimney stack. 

 

273 Dalhousie Street - Jones China Shop*

Description of Property

  • Building Name: Jones China Shop                            
  • Street Location: Dalhousie Street                               
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: Unknown                              
  • Original Owner: Peter Taylor, 1849, earliest
  • Present Use: Residential                            
  • Date of Construction: pre 1849         

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

Since the earliest recounts of Amherstburg history, the Jones China Shop has been a valued part of the Amherstburg community. The earliest account of the China Shop was in 1849 when the first weekly newspaper was published there by editor Charles Reeves. During this time, a portion of the building was a local grocery store owned by Peter Taylor.  The two storey brick building has always been a commercial building.

The date of the building is not presently known but was most definitely built before 1849.  The first Amherstburg weekly newspaper was published there in March, 1849, with Charles Reeve as editor. At the same period, a portion of the building was the grocery and general store of Peter Taylor. In the 1860s and 70s the property was occupied by John Gottlieb Kolfage. Kolfage was a very enterprising individual. He was Amherstburg’s most prominent merchant. Originally, on coming to Amherstburg, he had been a tanner but had expanded from that business to boots and shoes. Later he had a hardware store, tinsmith shop, dry goods, groceries, and clothing. Several of these businesses were carried on simultaneously but in different premises. Kolfage was also interested in local politics and became the first Amherstburg Mayor in 1878. (Previous to that Amherstburg was a village with Town powers). In the 1890s, the grocery business of Captain Trotter was a Great Lakes Mariner and enjoyed a large clientele from fellow shipmasters whom he supplied with groceries. Upon the death of Captain Trotter, the business was continued for a period by Captain Fred Trotter, a son. He later disposed of the business to the former clerks, Russell Scratch and Joseph Lovegrove. They were the first in Amherstburg to adopt the automobile for delivery purposes in approximately 1910. Later the partnership was dissolved and Mr. Lovegrove continued the business alone in other premises until his death in 1946. Meanwhile, the premises were re-modelled and made into an ice cream parlour and China Shop owned by George H. Jones. The place was noted for its cobblestone ice cream fountain. Gradually the china business became more important potion of the business and the ice cream business was phased out. Mr. Jones was active in municipal life being at various times a councillor and mayor and for an extended period was the Town Treasurer.

Heritage Attributes

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of Jones China Shop include:

 Brick under stucco exterior

  • Stone lintels similar in style to the Salmoni building
  • Timber wood frame roof structure
  • Stone lintels over windows similar to Salmoni style
  • Solid masonry walls

   

This two-storey brick building was likely built by Peter Taylor in 1849. By 1855, Peter's brother-in-law, Alexander Menzies, was selling dry goods, groceries, and fancy goods here. This building has always enjoyed commercial use.

 443 Dalhousie Street - John G. Kolfage Homestead

Description of Property

  • Building Name: John G. Kolfage                   
  • Street Location: 443 Dalhousie Street
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: John G. Kolfage
  • Original Owner: John G. Kolfage
  • Present Use: Private Residence
  • Date of Construction: 1855 

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

The cultural heritage value lies in its association with its original owner John G Kolfage, the first Mayor of the Town of Amherstburg. 

The homestead is located on property which is part of the original land grant deeded to William Caldwell, late Captain of Butlers Rangers by the Huron Tribe in 1783. 

A stone building at the rear of the house dates the time of William Caldwell. Many artifacts may lay hidden on the grounds of which a future archeological investigation may reveal.

Heritage Attributes

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of the John G Kolfage Homestead include:

 An example of late Georgian/early Victorian architecture remaining essentially in its original form.

  • The brick exterior is made of hand baked and premise made clay bricks, one of which displays the owner’s initials and the date 55 (1855) written into the unbaked clay.
  • Original limestone foundation remains intact
  • Original 6 over 6 wood windows remain with several having the original glazing.
  • Wood frame addition dating to the 1860’s is intact at the rear of the building
  • The rough field stone structure on the property at the rear of the house referred to the root house dates back to the times of William Caldwell. The structure includes hand hewn squared timbers with evidence of a previous fire

 

449 Dalhousie Street - Murray Smith Residence

Description of Property

  • Building Name: Smith, Murray Residence       
  • Street Location: Dalhousie Street                              
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: Francis B. Hackett (or Thomas A. Mears) 
  • Original Owner: Captain Francis Bondhead Hackett
  • Present Use: Residential                            
  • Date of Construction: Approx. 1870  

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

Many 19th century buildings in Southern Ontario were built in a vernacular style. The Murray Smith house is no exception. Common vernacular style was popular in the USA, Britain and also Quebec, however, these building have a characteristic recognizable as “Upper Canadian Flavour.” Characteristics of vernacular style include two storey buildings, large porches, bay windows, and stout support posts or forms of bracketing. The Murray Smith Residence demonstrates these characteristics allowing it to become an important part of Amherstburg’s heritage.     

Not only does the Murray Smith Residence bring architectural significance to Amherstburg, but the residence is a true testament to Amherstburg’s deep cultural heritage. This house is formerly the Captain Francis Bondhead Hackett residence, a well-known citizen of Amherstburg and owner and Captain of the wrecking tug “Home Rule.”  His tug “Francis B. Hackett” was the “Atomic” of that era. He was one of the seven sons of James Hackett, the Bois Blanc Lighthouse Keeper. James Hackett sailed the lakes some years after coming to Ontario and had the misfortune to lose three vessels and almost his life. He finally abandoned the lakes and was appointed by Governor-General Francis Bondhead as light keeper on Bois Blanc Island. As a token of appreciation, his son was named in honour of Governor-General Bondhead. The light house had been in care of the family for over 70 years. Captain F.B. Hackett was born at Bois Blanc lighthouse. He attended school in Amherstburg and at the age of 17 was ready to try his fortune on the water. His long experience on the lakes had made him familiar with their moods, and a few mariners have a better record as safe and reliable sailors. The Murray Smith Home was built in 1870 along colonial lines, in plain view of all the boats as they pass during the navigation season. In 1943, The Murray Smith home eventually became the possession of the Smith family. Murray Smith served as Amherstburg Mayor from  The Murray Smith home and it’s ties to the Bois Blanc Lighthouse, Fox Residence and R. Roberson Residence make the Murray Smith Residence an important part of Amherstburg’s cultural history. 

Heritage Attributes

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of the Murray Smith Residence include:

  • Bay windows in exterior
  • Wood brackets supporting roof
  • Plain eaves
  • Closed stonework porch and dry stone wall addition
  • Double hung sash with slip sill
  • Main door is a single leaf one panel door and has a rectangular head transom with side lights

455 Dalhousie Street - R. Robertson Residence*

Description of Property

  • Building Name: Robertson Residence                       
  • Street Location: Dalhousie Street                               
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: Unknown                              
  • Owner Address: Same as Above
  • Original Owner: Captain John T. Hutton
  • Present Use: Residential                            
  • Date of Construction: 1840    

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

Many 19th century buildings in Southern Ontario were built in a vernacular style. The Robertson Residence is no exception. Common vernacular style was popular in the USA, Britain and also Quebec, however, these building have a characteristic recognizable as “Upper Canadian Flavour.” Characteristics of vernacular style include two storey buildings, large porches, bay windows, and stout support posts or forms of bracketing. The Robertson Residence demonstrates these characteristics allowing it to become an important part of Amherstburg’s heritage. 

At one time, the Robertson Residence was the Capt. John Hutton residence. Captain Hutton was one of the oldest mariners of the Great Lakes. His father was a soldier in the English Army and came in 1838 to Ontario. John T. Hutton was born in Brockville and attended school in Amherstburg. In 1878 he took the first boat load of grain ever shipped from Washburn, Wisconsin, on the “John Shaw” in tow of the steamer “Anne Smith.” Although the main part of Captain Hutton’s life has been spent on water, he made a very valiant soldier at Fenian Raid, as a member of the Brockville Volunteers. His wife was the former Mary Meloche and they were married in 1871. The Robertson Residence was later used by a tenant as a millinery store in 1884. 

Heritage Attributes

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of include:

  • Elaborate fretsaw bracket in regency style on back of house
  • Tuscan Column front façade
  • Front porch elevation
  • Georgian influence

 

This residence exhibits the vernacular style in Southern Ontario in the 19th century. Notable attributes include the Tuscan column front façade with overall Georgian symmetry.

459 Dalhousie Street - Garnet Fox Residence*

Description of Property

  • Building Name: Garnet Fox Residence Street
  • Location: Dalhousie Street                              
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: Unknown                                
  • Owner Address: Same as Above
  • Original Owner: William Horsman
  • Present Use: Residential                            
  • Date of Construction: 1870       

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

Many 19th century buildings in Southern Ontario were built in a vernacular style. The Garnet Fox Residence is no exception. Common vernacular style was popular in the USA, Britain and also Quebec, however, these building have a characteristic recognizable as “Upper Canadian Flavour.” Characteristics of vernacular style include two storey buildings, large porches, bay windows, and stout support posts or forms of bracketing. The Garnet Fox Residence demonstrates these characteristics allowing it to become an important part of Amherstburg’s heritage inventory. 

The Garnet Fox residence also has historical significance in Amherstburg. The home was formerly the William T. Horsman Residence. Mr. Horsman owned a saw mill and operated a hotel known as Bullock’s Tavern on the corner of Dalhousie and Murray Street, now also a designated heritage site. Mr. Horsman was considered to be on the only progressive businessmen in town. Later, the house was occupied by Mr. Flynn, a wealthy American from Chicago. Mr. Flynn was the inventor of the ‘fire escape’ and used his royalties to buy property in Amherstburg. The Flynn subdivision (now commonly known as the Cherrylawn, Hawthorn, and the adjacent portion of Pickering) is named after him. The Fox Residence was later the residences of A.H. Stevenson and Richard Wilson. Finally, in 1976, it became the residences of Garnet Fox who was the Deputy-Reeve of Amherstburg and later became Mayor from 1979 to 1985.   

Heritage Attributes

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of Garnet Fox Residence include:

  • Third bay front
  • Two-storey building with a medium pitch roof
  • Plain eaves with projecting verges
  • Plain wooden lintel and wooden surround with sash over 2 panes.
  • Main door has a rectangular head transom  with side lights
  • Ontario vernacular building style.    

                           

Home of the former Mayor, Garnet Fox whose vision of a heritage community has led to the protection, preservation and conservation of the Town of Amherstburg's cultural heritage property.

483 Dalhousie Street - Jarmin McQueen House*

Description of Property

  • Building Name: Jarmin/McQueen House
  • Street Location: 483 Dalhousie Street
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: James Jarmin
  • Owner Address: 483 Dalhousie Street
  • Original Owner: James and Jane Jarmin
  • Present Use: Private Residence
  • Date of Construction: 1912

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

The Jarmin/McQueen house heritage value lies in it being an example of early 20th century Spanish Renaissance Architecture also known as Pressed Brick Mission Bungalow. The building remains essentially in its original form. This building was constructed in 1912. 

The cultural heritage value lies in its association with well known Amherstburg mariners and the rich maritime history of the Town. The original owner Captain James Jarmin (1872-1934) was one of the pioneer skippers on the great lakes and sailed those waters for more than half a century. Captain James Earl McQueen (1891-1957) operated McQueen Marine whose tugboat fleet was very active in the maritime history of Lake Erie and the Detroit River.  Both Captain Jarmin and Captain McQueen died in the house.

Heritage Attributes

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of the Captain Jarmin /McQueen House include:

 The prominent siting of the house on the lot.

  • Tower on the front elevation
  • Vitrified brick facings (painted)

 

This residence, constructed in 1912, exhibits Spanish architectural influences. Historically, the home has strong ties with the maritime culture of the town.

525 Dalhousie Street - Bellevue House*

Description of Property

  • Building Name: Belle Vue
  • Street Location: 525 Dalhousie St.
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: Mr. C Bullfinch, Architect
  • Ownership: Ontario Inc. (2007)
  • Owner Address: 7010 Hawthorne Dr.
  •                         Windsor, ON    N8T 3N3
  • Original Owner: Robert Reynolds      
  • Present Use: Private Residence
  • Date of Construction: 1816

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

Bellevue is one of the best, most unique examples of Georgian architecture of Palladian style within Ontario. Some of its most prominent features include twelve shuttered windows, front detailed ionic columns, and a detailed roof. Bellevue is an important aspect of Amherstburg’s cultural heritage and its association with the surrounding community. 

Bellevue was a residential dwelling built by Robert Reynolds, Commissioner of the Garrison of Fort Malden, linking the home’s past with Amherstburg’s Fort Malden National Historic Site. 197 men of the 37th regiment were employed for the construction of Bellevue, with each man putting in 1 day worth of work. The men were most likely employed to unload bricks from a vessel. The bricks of Bellevue were from the River Rouge, located near Dearborn, Michigan which was close to Reynolds’ birth place. Two years after Bellevue was erected, all unused bricks of Bellevue were donated by Reynolds to aid in the creation of Christ Church, another designated heritage site in Amherstburg.   Bellevue was also the home of Robert’s sister Catherine, a well known landscape artist. She has become known as “Detroit’s first native artist.” Her most famous watercolours include “View of Amherstburg” which is a portrait of the Bellevue property. Thirty of Catherine Reynold’s watercolours are currently on display at various museums within the greater community. 

In later years at the close of World War I, Veteran Homes were becoming established in various regions in Canada. In July, 1947 Bellevue Veterans Home was open and was home to eleven veterans of World War I and their caretakers. Although the veteran home was only in use for 5 years, many distinguished guests were noted to have visited, such as the Honourable Louis St. Laurent when he was Prime Minister of Canada and John G. Diefenbaker when he was a Saskatchewan Member of Parliament. The use of Bellevue for a World War I veteran home demonstrates the significance of Belleview and its important position in Canada’s national history.    

In later years, the rich heritage and unique architecture of Bellevue made the dwelling the perfect home for the St. Nicholas Ukrainian Catholic Church, an organization spawning from St. John the Baptist Parish in 1962. St. John the Baptist Church, another Amherstburg heritage site, held Ukrainian church services in the 1950s. However, two parishioners recognized the inadequacy in this arrangement and sought the cooperation of government representatives and the financial commitment of 21 parishioners in creating the ‘Ukrainian Village’ at Bellevue. The use of Bellevue as a Ukrainian Catholic Church demonstrates the importance of Bellevue’s ties to the religious and ethnic communities of Amherstburg.     

Heritage Attributes

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of Bellevue include:

  • Brick from the rouge river painted white
  • Symmetry in styling and layout
  • Rectangular floor plan
  • Metal hip roof with simple wooden brackets
  • Chimney at each end of the main building
  • Limestone foundation
  • Classic Georgian style pediment supported by four ionic style columns
  • 12 pane double hung windows with shutters
  • Concrete sills and lintels
  • Decorative brick belt between first and second story

 

As the home of Robert Reynolds, commissary to the British Garrison at Fort Malden, this property possesses historic and contextual value in its relationship with the War of 1812. This large brick structure is also one of few remaining examples of Georgian Architecture in Ontario.

563 Dalhousie Street - Thomas Boyle House*

Description of Property

  • Building Name: Thomas Boyle House           
  • Street Location: 563 Dalhousie St.      
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: John A. Maycock (Architect)           
  • Owner Address: Same as above          
  • Original Owner: Thomas Boyle           
  • Present Use: Private Residence     
  • Date of Construction: 1882 

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

The heritage value of the Boyle-Smith House lies in it being an excellent example of late 19th century Victorian Architecture in Amherstburg which remains basically in its original form. This building was designed by John A. Maycock whose Windsor practice was responsible for the design of many prominent buildings which include the former Essex Town Hall, Kingsville Public School and the Fleming Building in the City of Windsor.  Mr. Maycock was renowned as one of the most skilled draughtsman in Ontario having worked on mapping for the Dominion of Canada. 

Built in 1882 for Thomas Boyle, the house features arched windows, brick exterior in the stretcher bond. A prominent arch in brickwork frames the gable and fenestration on the front elevation. 

The Boyle-Smith House’s cultural heritage value lies in its association with sisters Grace and Edna Smith who owned the house for 67 years from 1912 to 1979. During part of that time they ran the Malden China and Woolen Shop from the wood frame accessory building which is on the property. Thomas Boyle, the original owner, was a lawyer working in Amherstburg and lived in the dwelling until his death in 1901.

Heritage Attributes

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of the Boyle-Smith House include:

  •  Stretcher bond brickwork
  • Tall arched windows formed in brick soldier courses
  • Original verge board mouldings (gingerbread) remain intact at the prominent gable facing the street.
  • Original chimneys with decorative brickwork remain intact.
  • A stained glass transom graces the front entry doors
  • A wood clapboard clad board accessory building is in the side yard in its original form.
  • Engaged brick arch at the front gable

  

This house, designated by renowned architect John A. Maycock, is a classic example of late 19th century Victorian architecture. Key exterior attributes include stretcher bond brickwork, gingerbread mouldings on the gable, and a stained glass transom.

669 Front Road North - Thomas Ouellette Carriage House

Description of Property

  • Building Name: Thomas Ouellette Carriage House
  • Street Location: Front Rd. N.                         
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: Unknown                    
  • Owner Address: Same as Above
  • Original Owner: Thomas Ouellette
  • Present Use: Residence                              
  • Date of Construction: 1880   

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

The Thomas Ouellette Carriage House’s heritage value lies in it being an example of late 1800’s outbuilding / pole barn architecture with unique decorative details not often found on simple building designs of the time.  Details such as large scrollwork in the steep front gables, the over-sized cupola (plans are in the works to replace this particular detail) set against the traditional board and batten wood siding. The majority of this building’s exterior remains in its original form and plans are in place to continue to restore it completely. This building was constructed by the owner in 1882.  These plans included a large cistern which has been uncovered by the present owners. 

The homestead’s cultural heritage value lies in its association with the main home at 671 Front Road North and its original owner Thomas Ouellette, a successful lumber baron from a well known EssexCounty family. 

In addition Francis Stone, the late wife of Raymond Stone, co-owed this property from 1947 to approx. 1974.  Around this time, the two buildings and the properties were legally separated and the 669 property was sold to Raymond’s brother, who maintained it, until it was sold again to the present owners in 2000. 

During her life, Mrs. Stone was deeply involved with a number of heritage projects in the Amherstburg area.  It was the wishes of Mr. & Mrs. Stone that these homes be preserved and that subsequent owners carry on this tradition.

Heritage Attributes

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of the carriage house include:

  • The prominent sitting of the house on the lot.
  • The decorative wooden ornaments that set it apart from a traditional out-building
  • The traditional board and batten vertical wood siding
  • The post and beam construction allowing for large spans in the interior
  • The high pitched main roof and over-sized gables

 A number of efforts have been put forth by the present and past owners to maintain the home’s community prominence:

  •  Annual participation in Doors Open Amherstburg
  • Featured home in various publications and on local cable & broadcast television
  • Well known and identified in the community and surrounding area in association with the main home at 671 Front Road North.       

671 Front Road North - Thomas Ouellette Manor

Description of Property

  • Building Name: Thomas Ouellette Manor/ Island View Manor
  • Street Location: Front Rd. N.                         
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: Unknown                              
  • Owner Address: Same as Above                                                       
  • Original Owner: Thomas Ouellette  
  • Present Use: Private Residence 
  • Date of Construction: 1880         

 Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

The heritage value of the Thomas Ouellette Manor, also known as Island View Manor, lies in it’s example of French Second Empire architecture as can be seen in the architectural details at the Mansard roof, tall, narrow windows and ornate corbels and detail works. The majority of the building remains in its original form, with a rear facing section being removed in the 1960’s. This building was constructed by the owner in 1881. 

The homestead’s cultural heritage value lies in its association with its original owner Thomas Ouellette, a successful lumber baron from a well known Essex County family.

Heritage Attributes

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of Island View include:

  •  The prominent sitting of the house on the lot.
  • The decorative wooden ornaments typical to Second Empire styling
  • The symmetrical placement of windows to a central entrance door
  • Grooved wood siding designed to look like stone block
  • Large, columned front and side porches

A number of efforts have been put forth by the present and past owners to maintain the home’s community prominence:

  • Annual participation in Doors Open Amherstburg
  • Featured home in various publications and on local cable & broadcast television

Well known and identified in the community and surrounding area.

    

232 George Street - First Baptist Church

Description of Property

  • Building Name: First Baptist Church
  • Street Location: George St.                             
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: Unknown  
  • Ownership: Baptist                                              
  • Owner Address: Same as Above
  • Original Owner: 
  • Present Use: Church                                  
  • Date of Construction: 1848    

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

The building is one of the oldest Baptist Churches in Ontario. The church is of barn frame construction. Its ecclesiastical function is suggested by the pointed windows, and intersecting glazing bars in the double-hung sash. 

The representative for the 'Town presented additional information from a publication titled "Pathfinders of Liberty and Truth, published in 1940 by H. A. Talbot of Windsor and authorized by the congregation, which ran as follows: 

Amherstburg Church existed as a Mission as early as 1838, services being held in the homes of members. Rev. Anthony Binga appears to have been the first Pastor. 

It was here, in 1840, that representatives of a few colored Baptist congregations met and formed the Amherstburg Baptist Association. 

The Church began to hold regular meetings in a house on George Street, next to the present church building.

This history is all too brief to mention the names of everyone who helped make the Mission successful. Elders Peter Stokes, Horace Hawkins, Isaac Rice: Deacons N. W. Brown, Valentine, Duncan, Lightfoot, French, and D. Medley, are only a few of the sturdy pioneers who helped to carry on the Mission before the erection of the present edifice. 

Missionary activity amongst fugitive slaves added rapidly to the membership of the little Church, and in 1845 it was decided to build.

The Pastor, Rev. Anthony Binga, became on itinerant preacher. On foot and horseback he travelled through the bush to the sparsely settled communities of Southwestern Ontario, establishing new Missions, and collecting funds for the building. Thus Amherstburg confirmed her title of 'Mother Church of the Association'.

The erection of this church is a story of pioneer days, and of primitive methods, and hardships. All the timber were hauled from the bush, and hewn by hand. All the lumber used, from the sheeting to the clapboards that covered the first roof, was procured in the same way.

The master carpenter was Deacon George Crawford (grandfather of the present Association Clerk). His first assistant was Nathan McCurdy, who was a member of the British American Methodist Episcopal Church which had been established on King Street. The Board of Deacons made up the carpenters' helpers. They were: Valentine, Stevens, Lyons, Adams and Medley. Their descendants are mostly scattered, but a few of them still live in homes built in the-vicinity of the church.

The dedication of the new church was an occasion for great rejoicing. The new missions were represented, as well as the affiliated churches in Detroit.

Father Binga continued this pastorate until 1857 when he was transferred to Mount Pleasant. In 1858, the church had no pastor, and services were conducted by Deacon F. Bush and E. Valentine. At that time Rev. J. D. Holbert was a local licentiate minister, but was not stationed in Amherstburg. A few years later, he came to Amherstburg as full pastor of the Church. Few have given more faithful service to the cause then he.

At this period two well-known names in Amherstburg's civil life, Dr. Pearson and M. Stevens, were prominent in the life of the Church and the Association. In 1865 Father Binga returned as pastor for a short time. He was followed in 1866 by Elder R. M. Duling. J. Smith was clerk at that time and Henry Foster and Dr. W. Edwards were on the Board of Deacons.

Shortly after this Rev. Anthony Binga Jr., was ordained and later pastored this Church. However, he was only with us a short while, becoming one of our worthy contributions to the work in the much wider field of the United States.

In 1870 Rev. R. Fairfax was pastor. He was succeeded in 1871 by Rev. William Pitt, a white minister. This was the only occasion in the history of the church when it was pastored by a white minister. He was followed by Rev. Jos. 0. Johnston.

A local historian wrote the following account 0f the Church:

This structure located at 232 George Street dates from its dedication December 25, 1849. Its congregation is older still and had earlier worshipped in a building only recently razed {at the south-east corner of Richmond and George). It was the first Baptist Church in Ontario and became the mother church of the First Regular Baptist Association. The congregation was formed almost entirely of former slaves, fugitives from the United States. About 26 churches of this denomination extended from Ypsilanti, Michigan to Halifax, Nova Scotia. The Amherstburg church figures in literary history as in Harriet Beecher Stowe's book, "Uncle Tom's Cabin", the principal character "Eliza Harris" was united with her husband at this church.

The church was built by members of the congregation under the direction of one of their members, a master builder. With the exception of the addition, the church remains much as it was when built.

Heritage Attributes

The First Baptist Church, as one of the oldest churches in Ontario, is practically of the 'meeting-house' type and conceived in a simple version of the Neo-Classic style. The body of the church is a rectangular form. In the 1840’s, Gothic was the proper style for churches. The windows have pointed arches and the glazing bars interlace so as to form a simple type of tracery. However, in this case, the windows are the only suggestion of Gothic in the whole building. The result is a mixed style with a good deal of charm.  There is evidence of its builders' intention to recreate a traditional English Church but the building's bold massing and simple form look somewhat naive in contrast to the subtleties of English churches. 

The Church is a small one-storey building, covered in white, six inches wide asbestos siding. The building is of barn-frame construction, with white oak beam 2" x 16" board and 6" x 6" stud 2 feet on centre. It rests on a cement block foundation, which replaced the original limestone foundation. The asbestos siding is applied over the original 6" hand-hewn wood siding. 

The Church has a gable roof with a generous overhang, topped by a tall brick chimney at the rear. The roofing is asphalt shingle over a previous wood-shingles covering. 

The entranceway is in a vestibule at the gable end and facing George Street. It has a double solid door, a later replc1cement, topped with Gothic Arched transom. The symbolism of the entrance plays an important role in Christian churches -- "I am the door: by me if any man enter in, he shall be served." The windows on either side of the vestibule are long and narrow each with a pointed arch and a simple wood surround. 

The North and south walls are three bays wide. The windows recall Gothic forms.  The church ecclesiastical function is suggested by the pointed windows, with intersecting glazing bars in the double hung sash - the so-called switch-line tracery.  The original windows have plain glasses pasted over with paper flowers and later replace with stained glasses. The intention is to alter the effect of the church internally as well as externally.

The one storey new addition to the back has an entrance flanked by four double windows with simple wood surrounds. The rear addition is topped by a gable roof. It has the same broad overhang. The windows on the north and south sides are double windows. Asbestos siding has been used to visually join the old .section with the new one.

109 Gore Street - Lloyd Brown Residence

Description of Property

  • Building Name: Lloyd Brown Residence  (Dr. Hackett House)
  • Street Location: 109 Gore Street
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: Unknown
  • Owner Address: Same as above
  • Original Owner: Dr. Hackett
  • Present Use: Private Home
  • Date of Construction: Unknown    

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

 

Heritage Attributes         

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of the Lloyd Brown Residence include:

  • Georgian influences
  • Two storeys built with wooden frame and stone foundation with clad-board siding.
  • Facade divided in to three bays- central bay with wooden porch with square posts and a pediment
  • Highly decorated porch replaced with a simple and plain modern interpretation of Georgian Style
  • Door flanked by two windows
  • String sense of symmetry and balance
  • Pair of chimneys on roof with plain stone caps
  • Plain wood eaves, projecting verges and friezes 

193 Gore Street - Gibb House

Description of Property

  • Building Name: Gibb House
  • Street Location: 193 Gore St.
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: Unknown
  • Owner Address: 528 Meloche Road
  •                         Amherstburg, ON N9V 2Y8
  • Original Owner: Remi Primeau
  • Present Use: Residential
  • Date of Construction: 1840

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

Gibb House is a story-and-a-half structure with a steeply pitched gable roof and a rear lean-to masked on the Gore Street side by a boomtown front. The building was a former log house but the remains of this have long since been obscured through renovations. The log house design is still visible through the entrance way door flanked by two windows, however, later additions include front and side porches with hipped roofs making the log house design difficult to distinguish. Kitchen improvements occurred in the early 20th century. 

Gibb House is an important part of Amherstburg’s cultural heritage. Gibb House was originally owned by Jean Baptiste Robidoux and was located next to the his Blacksmith Shop at 197 Gore, which was inhabited by blacksmith and tenant Remi Primeau in another designated Amherstburg site known as the ‘Old Blacksmith Shop.’ Remi Primeau, the town blacksmith and wagon-maker, worked in the blacksmith shop and lived next door in Robidoux’s log home. The Robidoux/Primeau residence was also a small community store and meat shop significant to the community for servicing the Amherstburg residents’ daily needs. 

Around 1910, the property became a salvage yard operated by Louis Phillip, a Jewish settler from Russia. Subsequently, after Phillip’s death, Mr. James Gibb became the owner of the property. Mr. Gibb became an employee of one of the Amherstburg beer docks during the prohibition era. When prohibition ended, Mr. Gibb purchased one of the warehouses (locally called “beer sheds”) and removed it to his gore street lot and attached it to his residence, acting as a reminder of an interesting period in Amherstburg’s history.  

 Heritage Attributes   

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of The Blacksmith Shop include:

  • Sharply inclined gable roof
  • Rear lean-to masked on Gore Street by a boomtown front
  • Lean-to block pattern wood siding imitating masonry
  • Clapboard rear end of lean-to  
  • Small stove chimney
  • Door flanked by windows
  • Single paned sash on windows
  • Low plaster ceilings characteristic of log houses
  • Rustic concrete block foundation, previously on stones 

197 Gore Street - Blacksmith Shop

Description of Property

  • Building Name: Old Black Smith Shop
  • Street Location: 197 Gore St.
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: William Burnell, Contractor
  • Owner Address: Same as Above         
  • Original Owner: Remi Primeau
  • Present Use: Residential Apartments
  • Date of Construction: 1840

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

The structure at 197 Gore Street is known as the last remaining Amherstburg blacksmith shop, surviving until 1977.  The original building was modified at various times in order to modernize the building. The original building was extended 15 ft to the west and a straight staircase was added to the exterior. Aluminum siding and other modernizations have greatly changed the original structure, however, the structure still remains on the original site. At once point, the building included a pair of double doors in the upper storey, used to allow the passage of vehicles hoisted up to the carriage shop by a crane beam. While the upper floor contained the carriage shop, the bottom floor contained the blacksmith shop, as the smith’s and millwright’s trades were often combined, developing into the manufacture of wagons, sleighs, and carriages.     

The Blacksmith Shop is an important part of Amherstburg’s cultural heritage. The blacksmith shop owned by Jean Baptiste Robidoux was next to the Robidoux log-house residence at 192 Gore inhabited by tenant and blacksmith Francis Primeau, which was another designated Amherstburg site known as ‘Gibb House.’ The Primeau residence was also a small community store and meat shop significant to the community for servicing the Amherstburg residents daily needs.  

Heritage Attributes   

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of Gibb House include:

  • shallow rectangular floor plan
  • two chimney stacks at either end of the roof
  • 4 bay front with side door
  • constructed of board and batten in simplest form
  • two storey gable
  • sits back from street 

207 Gore Street - Bondy Residence

 Description of Property

The Bondy Residence is a two story log framed residential building with white stucco exterior located on the west side of Gore St.

  • Building Name: Bondy Residence
  • Street Location: 207 Gore St.
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: Unknown
  • Original Owner: James Cladwell
  • Present Use: Residential
  • Date of Construction: As early as 1830; 1840 addition 

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

The Bondy Residence was owned by James Caldwell, son of Col. William Caldwell of the Indian Department. The home was originally a one-storey log-constructed dwelling, fashioned in the traditional layout used by the first settlers. The home is comprised of wooden logs with the exterior encased in stucco as well as two front and side porches added on at a later date. The once one-storey log constructed home was expanded to become a two-storey residential dwelling with a new addition taking place in approximately 1840. 

Col. William Caldwell, the owner’s father, served of gallantry in the British Army during the revolutionary war. At the close of the revolution, he came to Amherstburg and received a large tract of land. James Caldwell was one of the two sons who were not officers in the War of 1812. The Caldwell family have been involved with some of the most stirring events in Ontario History, linking the Town of Amherstburg with the significant history of Ontario. The residence was practical in it’s time and place and had a high functional use. It has successfully achieved a considerable degree of quiet elegance and undoubtedly is one of the few remaining early log houses in Amherstburg. 

Heritage Attributes  

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of the Bondy Residence include:

 Rear additions of hand-hewn timber frame construction

  • Rectangular plan with north facing entrance way
  • Stucco covered logs comprise the walls
  • Concrete platform at front of the house carried up and finished with a gable.
  • Double hung sash window with double panes on one side and a large fixed glass windows
  • Gable roof with brick chimney stack
  • Plain eaves with sloped soffits

217 Gore Street - Ralph Jimmerfield Residence*

Description of Property

  • Building Name: Ralph Jimmerfield Residence (Salt Box House)                   
  • Street Location: 217 Gore Street
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: Unknown
  • Owner Address: Same as above
  • Original Owner: Unknown
  • Present Use: Private Residence
  • Date of Construction: 1850

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

The Jimmerfield Residence is a classic example of a saltbox home and is the only known dwelling built of Saltbox construction. 

The Jimmerfield Residence holds a strong presence in Amherstburg due to a shared history with the Robert Triolet Residence, the Tonon Residence, and the Melvin Simpson Residence. Theses four homes have a common history dating from the time when fugitive slaves were arriving almost weekly between 1830 and 1850. The homes were located in the section known as the “Back of Town.” Various missionary societies and anti-slavery advocates assisted the fugitive blacks in establishing themselves in that area. Particularly active were two of the Amherstburg Magistrates, Charles Stuart and John Sloan. Both men were former British Officers- Stuart from the Army and Sloan from the Navy. They both sold town lots to the fugitives at extremely low rates. Among the early residents were the Crawfords and the Adams. Adams was appointed to, or assumed, the officer of “Town Crier.” Equipped with a large hand bell, he would make the rounds of the town stopping at various locations to announce bits of news. It is known that on one occasion in the 1870s, an item was “Little girl fell out of wagon and broke her leg.” In respect to the name “Adams” it was only one of the Presidential names that could be found among the Amherstburg fugitives. Other prominent slave families included the names of Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe, and Jackson. Great land-owners were represented by the names Firfax and Lee. The Adriano Tonon Residence represents an important phase in Amherstburg history often forgotten. Anecdotal history can only illuminate a portion of Amherstburg’s local history, however, it points to a rich and important past.

Heritage Attributes  

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of the Ralph Jimmerfield Residence include:

  • Wood siding comprised on medium width (5”+) clapboard with started  board detail at the base and plan corner boards survives under the insulbrick.
  • Timberwood frame around kitchen
  • Plain eaves with sloped soffits
  • Symmetrical windows

 

This home, an example of the 'salt box' design, was designated in the 1970s as the 'Ralph Jimmerfield Residence' after former owners. George Crawford a Kentuckian of Cherokee and African descent and a carpenter by trade, came to Amherstburg in the early 1840s. He bought this property in 1851 and his descendants remained here for over 90 years. Crawford was instrumental in building other homes in the area for fugitive slaves and assisted in the building of the First Baptist Church circa 1845.

246 King Street - Church of God in Christ

Description of Property

MountBeulahChurch of God in Christ is a bricked building painted white located on the west side of King Street.

  • Building Name: Mount Beulah Church of God in Christ            
  • Street Location: 246 King St.
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: Unknown
  • Ownership: Church of God in Christ
  • Owner Address: Same as Above                     
  • Original Owner: Unknown
  • Present Use: Place of Worship
  • Date of Construction: 1878

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest 

MountBeulahChurch of God in Christ is an example of an early school house in Amherstburg characteristic of schools in the rural setting. The building was built in 1875 and known as the KingStreetSchool with the purpose of schooling Black students in the community. This building replaced the first Black school, a building made of logs, formerly located on the site.  In 1909 the school was closed and the students were relocated to the Public School on Richmond Street. During this time the building was used as barracks for the housing recruits who enlisted overseas during WWI. MountBeulahChurch of God in Christ has a distinct connection to Amherstburg’s Black and Wartime history.

In 1918, the building was purchased by Amherstburg hardware merchant George Pettypiece who operated a cement works there for several years. On January 20, 1949 the building was purchased by the CanadianChurch of God in Christ under the leadership of Bishop C.L Morton Sr., the founder of the church. Previous to purchasing the building, services were held in the Morley Stewart home, After a period of time, the church was remodel and renamed Mount Beulah Church if God in Christ. In addition to the rear of the structure was erected in 1984. This allowed for the Sunday school rooms, washrooms, a kitchen, dining area, and pastors study. The sanctuary was remodelled in 1992. In recent years, the church under went renovations including a modern sign indicating the building’s purpose.      

Heritage Attributes  

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of Mount Beulah Church of God in Christ include:

 Rectangular building plan

  • One storey high
  • Flat-roof design
  • Limestone faced with plaster
  • Large double sided doorway topped with lancet arch characteristic of Gothic Revival
  • Stone sill
  • Symmetric design
  • Single pane double hung sash windows
  • Brick chimney stack
  • Medium pitch gable roof
  • Plane eaves with sloped soffits

266 King Street - Lighthouse Chapel*

Description of Property

  • Building Name: Lighthouse Baptist Church           
  • Street Location: 266 King St.
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: Unknown
  • Ownership: Baptist Church
  • Owner Address: Same as Above
  • Original Owner: Roman Catholic Church
  • Present Use: Place of Worship
  • Date of Construction: 1856

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest 

The LighthouseBaptistChurch is architecturally significant because it is an example of an early school house in Ontario. The building is created from bits of random limestone. The school design was distinctly elegant, though not advanced by the standards of the 19th century. Each window opening contains a fully developed classical tradition and is enclosed by a segmental arch. The building provides a refreshing break on King Street and at the same time the building’s stonework carefully maintains the street line. 

The Lighthouse Chapel was built in 1875 by Peter Benner for the St. John the Baptist Parish. It was built of local limestone donated by the T.B White Proprietor of the Anderdon Quarry. T.B. White was a son of Solomon White, Council Chief of the Anderdon Band of Wyandotte Indians. In 1836, when the Anderdon reserve was surrendered and opened for settlement the White family retained their share of tribal lands the stone quarry on the Second Concession. This stone school replaced a smaller school of log construction on the same site. An early principal, if not the first, was Gordon Colborne who later left the teaching profession to study medicine. This log school was one of the earliest separate schools in Ontario. The basis of separation for St. John the BaptistSchool was the religious views of the parents, while other separate schools at that time were separated based on race. The setting up the St. John the Baptist school drained the Amherstburg public schools of all the Roman Catholic pupils leaving the Public Schools to be considered Protestant schools. One result was the latent religious prejudices came to the surface when frequent confrontations between the students of St. John the Baptist and the nearest Public School took place. These ranged from snowball fights to general scuffles with plenty of fisticuffs. 

When St. Rose Separate School was built to replace the over-crowded St. John the BaptistSeparateSchool, the old school became the Parish Hall. It had always enjoyed a dual function being the Amherstburg headquarters of several Catholic lay societies including the St. John the Baptist Society and the Catholic Men’s Temperance Society. However, from time to time when over-crowding became a problem, the old school was used for temporary classrooms. In time, parish use of the building dwindled to the point where further fund for upkeep were not justified so the building was sold to a Pentecostal group who renamed the building “The Lighthouse Chapel.” The group subsequently held church services commencing in September 1971.* 

*Mr. David Botsford from the Raymond Chung Report

Heritage Attributes  

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of Lighthouse Chapel include:

  • Early schoolhouse layout and architecture
  • Medium pitched gable roof of galvanized steel  in rear, flat roof in church proper
  • Plain eaves with projecting verges
  • Stained glass windows double hung with 20 over 16 panes sash
  • Windows enclosed by classical arch
  • Innate limestone stonework detailed exterior

 

The original purpose of this limestone building, which now functions as a church, was to serve both as a schoolhouse for the Senior Catholic Boys of St. John the Baptist Parish and an activities hall.

273 King Street - Nazrey A.M.E. Church*

Description of Property

  • Building Name: Nazrey African Methodist Episcopal Church                                  
  • Street Location: 273 King St.
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: Escaped Slaves
  • Ownership: North American Black Historical Museum        
  • Owner Address: Same as above          
  • Original Owner: Unknown                                                                                             
  • Present Use: Public Museum                    
  • Date of Construction: Unknown     

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest 

The NazreyA.M.EChurch was built in 1848 by some of the escaped slaves who chose Amherstburg as the place where they decided to settle. The NazreyChurch is not only the oldest BlackChurch in Amherstburg but also one of the oldest Black Churches in all of Canada. It was the first black National Historic Site designated in Canada. 

Heritage Attributes  

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of the Nazrey African Methodist Episcopal Church include:

  • Gable roof
  • Gothic elements
  • Solid limestone walls 18” – 20” thick made with a rubble stone technique with stucco surfacing outside and plaster inside.
  • Outside stucco made of coarse aggregate with stone patterns 12” x 24” inscribed over the outside walls.
  • 6 gothic windows  and gothic inspired entrance
  • Barge boards under eaves and gables with Georgian style mouldings
  • V matched sheeting with 3 vaulted ceiling beams with Victorian buttresses in the supporting structure
  • A wooden apron sits  3’ high along the perimeter of the wall of the church and there is a classic moulding along the top of the apron. 

                                                                

This vernacular fieldstone church was built in 1848 by refugee slaves settling in Amherstburg. It has been designated as a National Historic Site for its significant heritage value.

This site is part of the Amherstburg Freedom Museum.  

Public - fee may apply

277 King Street - Amherstburg Freedom Museum*

Description of Property

  • Building Name: North American Black History Museum
  • Street Location: 277 King St.
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: Unknown                  
  • Ownership: North American Black History Museum   
  • Owner Address: Same as above          
  • Original Owner: James Keville
  • Present Use: Black History Museum        
  • Date of Construction: Approx 1845-1852     

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest 

The lot upon which the old log house presently sits was originally purchase from the crown. On August 21, 1844, James Keville purchased from the Crown for an unknown amount, a 7,800 sq. ft. lot measuring 60’ by 130’. The original survey drawings for this area do not show a building on the lot and these drawings are believed to have originated sometime between 1845 and 1852. The building presently on the property was moved from the Fort Malden Military Reserve to its present location before 1862. The property was purchased by Hannah Dunville from James Keville in 1862 for $300 and the property was again sold in 1881 to Susan Boxall for $305. 

Mr. George Taylor Jr. and his wife were the first known Black people to inhabit the house and are believed to have moved in during the latter part of the 1880s. Mr. Taylor was an escaped slave from Kentucky who in 1863 enlisted in the civil war and was discharged in 1865. 

When the building was first moved onto the property, it did not have a liveable second storey, but only a small loft. Nasa McCurdy who was instrumental in designing and building the NazeryA.M.EChurch in 1848, and his son George, raised the roof of the home to make a liveable second floor. 

This building is important to the heritage of the Amherstburg community because many Negroes in the years around 1837 were among the defenders of the Canadian frontier during the patriot insurrection. Many of them have been slaves in the southern United States and had escaped via the underground railway to the BritishProvince while others had come as servants to Loyalist families who settled near FortMalden. 

This influx of Black people however, was gradual until 1850 when the United States congress passed the Fugitive Slave Act which required escaped slaves to return to new bondage. A large scale immigration of slaves to Canada followed and by the start of the Civil War, approximately 30,000 lived in Canada, mainly near the Detroit and Niagara frontiers. In Amherstburg, a number of these families settled in various parts of town and their descendants still live in Amherstburg today. 

Heritage Attributes  

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of NorthAmericanBlackHistoryMuseum include:

  • Early example of a log construction
  • Building inhabited by early Black families allowing it to become a unique representation of the conditions which affected the lives of the people at that time.
  • Renovations conducted by Nasa McCurdy which allowed for a liveable second storey

 

The Museum complex, (consisting of a log cabin, the Nazrey African Methodist Episcopal Church (circa 1848), and exhibited artifacts), preserves our region's Black Heritage from African origins to the present day. There is a focus on the Underground Railroad, There is a focus on the Underground Railroad movement, Canadian Black settlement and the accomplishments and constitutions of the people of African origins who helped shape this great nation.

Public - fee may apply

www.amherstburgfreedom.org

Amherstburg Freedom Museum Facebook Page

281 King Street - Melvin Simpson Residence

Description of Property

  • Building Name: Melvin Simpson Residence
  • Street Location: 281 King St.
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: Unknown
  • Ownership: Joan Patricia Bray
  • Owner Address: Same as above
  • Original Owner: Horace Cote (1862-Previous Not available)
  • Present Use: Private Residence                         
  • Date of Construction: Approx 1830         

 Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest  

The Melvin Simpson Residence is a storey and a half log structure with brick fill-in. The original section of the house is on a stone foundation which has been replaced with modern concrete blocks. The side porch and lean-to are alo later additions. The Melvin Simpson residence is the only known existing building in Amherstburg made of log frame with brick construction with original clapboard siding.

The Melvin Simpson Residence holds a strong presence in Amherstburg due to a shared history with the Robert Triolet Residence, the Ralph Jimmerfield Residence, and the Adriano Tonon Residence. Theses four homes have a common history dating from the time when fugitives slaves were arriving almost weekly between 1830 and 1850. The homes were located in the section known as the “Back of Town.” Various missionary societies and anti-slavery advocates assisted the fugitive blacks in establishing themselves in that area. Particularly active were two of the Amherstburg Magistrates, Charles Stuart and John Sloan. Both men were former British Officers- Stuart from the Army and Sloan from the Navy. They both sold town lots to the fugitive slaves at extremely low rates. Among the early residents were the Crawfords and the Adams. Adams was appointed to, or assumed, the officer of “Town Crier.” Equipped with a large hand bell, he would make the rounds of the town stopping at various locations to announce bits of news. It is known that on one occasion in the 1870s, an item was “Little girl fell out of wagon and broke her leg.” In respect to the name “Adams” it was only one of the Presidential names that could be found among the Amherstburg fugitives. Other prominent slave families included the names of Washington, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe, and Jackson. Great land-owners were represented by the names Firfax and Lee. The Melvin Simpson house represent an important phase in Amherstburg history often forgotten. Anecdotal history can only illuminate a portion of Amherstburg’s local history, however, it points to a rich and important past. 

It is also important to note that Melvin “Mac” Simpson was the founder of the NorthAmericanBlackHistoryMuseum which was created to “do something tangible to increase the level of Black Awareness. Melvin developed “the concept of a Black Museum  which would uncover and preserve the record of the rich heritage Black people have, making it available for the positive development of the Black Community and for the general educational benefit of all people who constitute Canadian Society.”

Heritage Attributes  

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of the Melvin Simpson Residence include:

  • Medium pitch gable roof with shed dormers
  • Closed eaves with closed verges
  • Double hung windows with wood sill and wood surround
  • Log and brick construction
  • Small chimney stacks at ridge of main building
  • Shed and Stable outbuildings on the property
  • The prominent location of the residence near NazreyChurch and NorthAmericanBlackHistoricalMuseum  

51 North Street - Clement Parlette House*

Description of Property

  • Building Name: Clement Parlette House
  • Street Location: 51 North Street
  • Legal Description: Concession Plan 2, Lot 12
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Town of Amherstburg
  • Builder: Clement Parlette
  • Ownership: David Bradley & Paula Marie Kellam
  • Original Owner: Clement Parlette
  • Original Use: Private Residence
  • Present Use: Private Residence
  • Date of Construction: 1873

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest   

 

Heritage Attributes 

51 North Street was constructed in 1873 by Clement Parlette, Carpenter.  (The lot was originally owned by Arthur McKee Rankin).  Another key feature of the house is in close proximity to Fort Malden. 

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of the house include: 

  • Single story with Gothic Revival Cottage Style which is rare for the Town of Amherstburg
  • Close proximity to Fort Malden
  • Pointed Arch window over the main entrance
  • Transom over the front door
  • Original cornice fenestration details over the front windows
  • Shape and form of the original house remains intact

 Key interior attributes that embody the heritage value of the house include: 

  • All interior as well as the front entrance door and brass locks are original of 1873
  • Original wood mouldings on exterior windows original of 1873

 

Constructed by carpenter Clement Parlette, this charming residence is a rare example of the Gothic Revival Cottage Style in Amherstburg.

9399 North Townline Road - St. Joseph Church*

Description of Property

  • Building Name: St. Joseph’s Church                                                                                                          
  • Street Location: 9399 Townline Road,
  •                            Windsor Ontario, N9J 2W6
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: Unknown
  • Ownership: Dioceses of London
  • Owner Address: Same as above
  • Original Owner: Diocese of London
  • Present Use: Place of Worship
  • Date of Construction: 1911

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest   

St. Joseph Parish was founded in 1864 by incorporating the extremities of Assumption Parish (Windsor) founded in 1748 and St. John the Baptist Parish (Amherstburg) founded in 1802. St. JosephChurch is situated eleven kilometers from Amherstburg and sixteen kilometers from Windsor. The current Church is the third church on the site, with the first being a small Chapel located approximately where the rectory driveway is now. The first mass was celebrated in October 1864. Six years later in 1870 Father Marseille undertook the construction of the second Church, the first church on the site of the present church. The Church measured eighty feet in length by forty-five in width. A vestibule fifteen feet by twelve feet was in the front and had eight steps leading to this large porch.

In October 1910 a new pastor, Father Loiselle, was appointed to St. Joseph's. The new pastor quickly realized that the Parish had outgrown the existing Church. The first task Father Loiselle undertook was to build a modern rectory - the current one - at a cost of $7000. He then undertook the construction of a new Church. In the spring of 1911 the first Church was demolished to make way for the new one. Under the direction of Father Loiselle each able-bodied parishioner had to deliver his share of construction materials to the new Church site. 

Architect J.O. Turgeon of Montreal designed the Church Plans, the brickwork was done by Mr. Joseph Wilson of Amherstburg and the woodwork by Mr. Urgel Jacques of Windsor. The Church measures one hundred and fifty-eight feet long on the outside, one hundred and fifty-three feet long on the inside and sixty eight feet to the roof above the wall plates. On June 15, 1913 His Excellency Mgr. M.F. Fallon blessed the corner stone. The first mass was celebrated in the basement of the Church on Sunday, April 18, 1915. The first mass celebrated in the Church proper was on October 22, 1916 by Mgr. M.F. Fallon D.D. Bishop of London. The cost of building the new Church was $75,000. The Church is situated on the River Canard and over the years several bridges have been constructed. The first was a wooden bridge, which opened to allow boats through. This was replaced with a steel bridge built in 1906, which in turn was replaced with a cement bridge on September 1937 at a cost of $30,000. This cement bridge frames the Church as you approach it. The bridge was extensively repaired in 2002.

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Malczyks, Polish immigrants, redecorated the present interior of the Church in 1953. The paintings took over a year to do and depict seventeen religious scenes. In addition Mr. Austin Meloche, a parishioner of St. Joseph's, constructed walnut altars. Mr. Arthur Schilling of Detroit designed the Church altars. The main altar is 17 feet high while the side altars are 15 and one-half feet in height.

Heritage Attributes 

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of St. Joseph’s Church include:

  • Over the last ten years an ongoing restoration has been undertaken. The rectory, the Church storm windows and the steps were done first. The massive Church roof was completely redone next while the east, south and north exterior walls have been stabilized with stainless steel rods and repointed. The west wall and the interior still require restoration and will be done as funds allow. 
  • Brick
  • Masonry load baring walls
  • Integrity       

1864    Chapel constructed on site

1870    WoodChurch Constructed

1911    WoodChurch Demolished

1912    Corner Stone for existing Church Dedicated

1915    First Mass in Basement of Existing Church

1916    CurrentChurch Dedicated.

1937    CementBridge constructed over River Canard

1953    Church Redecorated, ceilings painted with scenes from the Bible

1960s   Vatican II changes; the altar is turned facing the people

1970s   New carpet installed on the altar and steps leading to altar

1990s   Rectory partially restored, stain glass windows repaired, side

            entrances rebuilt, front steps tiled, reconciliation room built

2001    East and South outside walls repaired, North outside wall                  

            repaired. 

109 Park Street - Gordon (McLeod) Residence

Description of Property

  • Address: 109 Park Street
  • Legal Description: Plan 3, Lot 5, south side Park Street
  • Name of Building: N/A
  • Type of Property: Residential
  • Date of Construction: c.1853
  • Original Owner: James Gordon/ John McLeod

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

The property has contextual value because it is important in defining, maintaining and supporting the character of the area. It is integral to contributing to the historic character of the streetscape which comprises similar modest, one- and one-and-one-half-storey houses – most of which also feature front-facing gables. Dating from c. 1858-60, the house is similar in age to the other five homes on the street which are identified on the Town’s Heritage Register, and which date all date from the 1850s, except one from 1878-79. Given that the home was built within the first decade of Park street being laid out in 1851, the home contributes to defining the historic character of the street.  

Heritage Attributes 

The primary heritage attributes (character-defining elements) of the property are:

  •  The current (original) location of the house on the property;
  •  The c. 1858-60 and c. 1884 portions of the house;
  •  The front-gable roof (c.1858-60 portion) and side-gable roof (c. 1884 portion) of the house;
  •   The red-brick chimney (c. 1884 portion);
  •   Classical-Revival style roof eave returns;
  •   Classical Revival style front door and transom-light assembly;
  •   Fenestration. 

Built c. 1855, the Gordon (McLeod) Residence is one-and-one-half storey, wood-frame house of vernacular design with Classical Revival-style finishes. The house occupies a residential context in the Town of Amherstburg's historic core. 

273 Ramsay Street - Dunbar Residence*

Description of Property

  • Building Name: Dunbar Residence                            
  • Street Location: 273 Ramsay St.
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: John Henry Abel
  • Owner Address: Same as Above
  • Original Owner: Unknown  
  • Present Use: Private Residence
  • Date of Construction: 1849 or 1857 (inconclusive)

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

The Dunbar Residence is a large two-storey brick building with Georgian style erected in 1849. It was one of three brick buildings built in that year and alluded to in the columns of the “Amherstburg Courier.” The others were the Salmoni Hotel and the Paxton Building. The building was built for a bakeshop and residence and was later used as a funeral home when purchased by a funeral director. The building was also the site of the Amherstburg Library for about 20 years until the Carnegie Library was opened in about 1911. Next a machine shop occupied part of the building, the remainder being used by the Pineau family. In 1917 the Amherstburg Continuation School occupied the building and remained there until the General Amherst High School was opened in 1921 since which time the building has been occupied as a residence. 

Although the property is known as the Dunbar house, it appears through careful consideration of the assessment rolls, Mr. Dunbar never owned or lived at the property. Assessment roll evidence suggests a Mr. Smith, a local Baker, lived and died within the home. The proposed owner, Mr. Dunbar, was also a baker and lived close in proximity to the home which possibly alludes to some of the confusion surrounding the property’s history. Still, some others reject this theory. 

Heritage Attributes 

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of the Dunbar Residence include:

  • Plain cornices on roof corner
  • Essence of balance, harmony, and symmetry
  • Georgian architectural influence
  • Stone slipsills under windows
  • Ornate Georgian porch

 

This home was built in 1861 by Daniel Smith, to function as his residence and bakery.  For a time, the building was owned and operated by the Amherstburg Library Board. Designated as 'Dunbar Residence'.

284 Ramsay Street - Frank Kehl Residence

Description of Property

  • Building Name: Frank Kehl Residence         
  • Street Location: 284 Ramsay St.                                
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: Stephen B. Grummond
  • Owner Address: Same as above
  • Original Owner: Stephen B. Grummond
  • Present Use: Private Residence
  • Date of Construction: 1840

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

The Frank Kehl Residence is on the two remaining examples of early Georgian brick architecture in the Town of Amherstburg. Historically, the main interest of the Kehl Residence is the site itself. Originally it was the site of the Peter Geauvrean Inn. Geauvreau was the son-in-law of the famous frontier personage, Simon Girty. Girty died there in February, 1818 and was given a military funeral as he had been connected with the British Indian Department since the Revolution. By the time of his death he was already a legend, the most widely-known character on the Western frontier. Shortly after Girty’s death the property was sold to Stephen B. Grummond who probably was the builder of the fine brick residence now on the site. At that period narrow alleys were still in places between the main streets and it is said that the brick residence fronted on the alley to secure a view of the river. Later the alleys were abandoned and incorporated into adjoining lots. 

Later inhabitants of the house were the Duncansons and the Kolfages. John Gottlieb Kolfage was the first mayor of Amherstburg and his son John Kolfage Jr. married and raised his family there.  

Heritage Attributes 

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of the Frank Kehl Residence include:

  • Brick masonry load bearing walls
  • Square floor plan
  • Two storey
  • Low gable roof
  • Two single stucco sheathed chimneys
  • Close eaves, closed verges
  • Cut stone slipsills on windows with plain wood surround
  • Portico porch with slender wood supports as later addition
  • Georgian brick architecture
  • Symmetrical balance and harmony
  • Double hung 12 pane windows

296 Ramsay Street - Chittenden House (Stone Cottage)*

Description of Property

  • Building Name: Chittenden House                            
  • Street Location: 296 Ramsay Street
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: Unknown
  • Owner Address: Same as above
  • Original Owner: Unknown
  • Present Use: Private Residence
  • Date of Construction: 1805 

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

Situated in the historic site of Old Amherstburg, this house is located on one of the first residential streets built in the area. It is the only building of it’s kind in the area. The property was passed down from John Chittenden, who in 1804 was a settler under the registration of July 6th, 1804, original nominee under administration of sir George Arthur, leutenant-govenor. The Chittendens were prominently connected with the early history of Detroit. George and James Chittenden were held by Col. Proctor after the taking of Detroit from General Hull, as hostages to guarantee the peace of the place. James Chittenden was clerk of MonguagonCounty in 1827. 

Another notable individual who owned the property in 1898 was Walter S. Kolfage, Amherstburg’s first Chief Magistrate after it’s incorporation as a town. He was born in Germany and came to Canada when he was very young. He opened a dry goods store in Amherstburg and in 1877 he built the Kolfage Block on Murray street which also was known as the Hadley block at the time. Kolfage was elected Mayor in 1878 and served for 3 terms where he was known as an astute businessman and a respected citizen. The Kolfages held on to the property for many years and lineages. 

Kolfage eventually sold the property to George F. Macdonald on April 15th, 1930. He was the president of Bartlet, Macdonald & Gow of Windsor and was an EssexCounty historian. He conceived the idea of of turning it in to the Museum Tea Room, having the glamour of that historic past upon which Amherstburg is founded. The Museum Tea Room was run by the hostess Mrs. Dunbar as the lady in charge.  

Heritage Attributes 

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of the Chittenden House include:

  • L-shaped with North wing
  • Wall material of squared rubble stone and wood
  • Two single bricked chimneys
  • Close eaves on roof
  • Flat structural opening windows with plain cut stone lintel and lugsill
  • Wood shutters – 2 panels
  • Flat structural opening of main door with plain cut stone surrounding head
  • Six pane transom
  • Arcade encircling main structure created by wood trellis supports and overhang roof
  • Louisiana and Military style influences, known as Regency style
  • Constructed in Regency fashion with building at street level with no frontage 

 

This structure is the only example of Regency architecture in the area. Key heritage attributes include the encircling arcade with overhanging roof, lack of frontage, and the overall low, street-level nature of the construction. Designated as 'Chittenden House'.

298 Ramsay Street - John Askin Residence

Description of Property

  • Building Name: John Askin Residence/ Hamilton House
  • Street Location: 298 Ramsay St.
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: John Askin Jr.
  • Owner Address: Private Residence
  • As above
  • Original Owner: John Hamilton
  • Present Use: Private Residence 
  • Date of Construction: 1830

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

The John Askin Residence is situated on one of the oldest street blocks west of the DetroitRiver and the Dalhousie Street (River Road) commercial areas. Also known as the Hamilton House, the John Askin Residence has been the family home of John Hamilton and descendants for many years. Originally it was the dwelling of John Askin Jr. who at the time of his death in Amherstburg on New Years Day in 1820, was Deputy Superintendent – General of Indian Affairs for the Western District. 

His father was the famed Detroit merchant John Askin, Sr. who was one of the earliest Albany merchants to become established in the Great Lakes following the treaty of Paris, first at Michimacinac and later at Detroit and also following the evacuation of Detroit in 1796 at Strabane on the Canadian shore of the DetroitRiver opposite Belle Isle. 

John Askin Jr.’s sister Catharine became the wife of Robert Hamilton for whom the city of Hamilton is named, while her own name Catharine is the origin of the neighbouring city of St. Catharines. His other sister Madeline was the first wife of Dr. Richardson, formerly of Simcoe’s Rangers and later surgeon to the Indian Department at FortAmherstburg. They were parents of two children, Jane, wife of Captain Richardson who was EssexCounty’s first historian and the author of The War of 1812 and the historical novels Wacousta and The Canadian Brothers

John Askin Jr.’s wife was Madeline Peltier (Antaya). Their son was John B. Askin who played a large part as magistrate in the formative years of London, Ontario. Ann Maria Askin and his wife Elizabeth, born in Amherstburg on August 29, 1819, had as sponsors at her baptism, Charles Berczy and Arthur Van Allen, early merchants, and Catherine Reynolds, early Upper Canada Artist associated with Amherstburg’s Belleview Mansion. Mrs, John Askin Jr. had wide-ranging social connections. No less than four of her sisters became the wives of American army officers. Of notes is Mrs. Askin’s older sister Marianne Peltier (Antaya) who became the wife of Captain John Cleves Semmes. Captain Semmes attracted international attention when he proposed the theory that the earth was hollow and the interior was inhabitable and accessible by way of the poles. Thus the John Askin House is of historical importance to Amherstburg in an antiquarian way as a peg on which to hang history.

Heritage Attributes  

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of the John Askin Residence include:

  • Clapboard walls with stone foundation
  • Medium gable roof
  • Two single brick chimneys on each end of roof
  • Plain eaves with projecting verges
  • Plain wood surround on windows with slipsill and 3 pane sash
  • Plain wood surround on door
  • Wood open porch with slender squared supports and decorative edging
  • Double stairway porch 

317 Ramsay Street - Christ Anglican Church*

Description of Property

  • Building Name: Christ Church                                  
  • Street Location: 317 Ramsay St.
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: Army Engineers, Richard Pollard (clergy)
  • Ownership: Anglican Synod of Huron
  • Owner Address: Same as above
  • Original Owner: Christ Church
  • Present Use: Place of Worship
  • Date of Construction: 1819

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

ChristChurch is on the oldest brick churches in the province and is always remembered when Amherstburg is recalled. This house of worship stands in simplicity, dignity, and beauty, baring witness to the period of pioneers and settlers of the colony. This building was designed and built by army engineers in 1819. It is of English origin than of American. The basic symbolism of the style here not Gothic but Romanesque as they were established in Britain in the 1800s. ChristChurch is therefore decidedly British. 

The Church of England in Amherstburg was established in 1792 with the appointment of Richard Pollard as lay missionary. In 1802, he became the first rector of the parish of Sandwich and Amherstburg as well as the Chaplain of Fort Malden for ChristChurch served as a garrison of FortMalden. 1804 saw Pollard ordained to the priesthood and shortly afterwards he undertook the construction of ChristChurch. However, prior to construction, the land was used as a burying ground which was donated by Col. William Caldwell. A substantial grant was also received from the British Government on the understanding that the regiment could attend services there. 

One of the oldest brick churches in the province, ChristChurch was completed in 1819. This modest brick contains the oldest brick nave in Ontario. The brick itself was most likely brought across the DetroitRiver from the Rouge, as a gift of Robert Reynolds from the commissariat department at the Fort. Built by army engineers, the ceiling displays unique workmanship as it is built of native rough hewn timber. The timbers 10’ x 10’ are bound together with oaken pins and roughly formed iron bands. The nails were hand made by former slaves living a mile south at Col. Elliot’s. 

In the early period, the Church was used as the Masonic Lodge room due to Richard Pollard’s close association with the Masonry. He obtained the first charter for a lodge in Amherstburg but until this point, all meetings were held in the choir loft. Attached to his church lies the ChristChurch churchyard, which along with the church, was consecrated in 1833 by Rt. Rev. C.J. Stewart  who was the Bishop of Quebec. In the cemetery lies Alexander Duff, the Captain of the Volunteers who died and was buried in the oldest grave in 1809. 

Heritage Attributes  

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of ChristChurch include:

  • Apsidal plan with central façade porch
  • Brick wall  with wood trim and cut stone
  • Arcading on façade
  • Medium gable roof with boxed cornices and cut stone urn on façade corners
  • Stained glass windows commemorating masons, soldiers, and mariners.
  • Main window is semi circular with brick radiating vousoir surrounding a head cut stone lugsill

  

Christ (Anglican) Church is one of the oldest religious buildings in Ontario, the first service being conducted in 1819 by Rev. Richard Pollard, who served as chaplain to the garrison at Fort Malden. Built by the Royal Engineers from Fort Malden in 1819, this church contains one of the oldest brick naves in the province.

61 Rankin Avenue - Jepson Duke House

Description of Property

  • Building Name: Jepson Duke House              
  • Street Location: 61 Rankin Ave.
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: James Wilderspin
  • Owner Address: Same as above          
  • Original Owner: Eleanor and Jepson Duke
  • Present Use: Residential                            
  • Date of Construction: 1901

 Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

The Jepson Duke house’s heritage value lies in it being an example of late turn of the century Queen Anne Victorian architecture as can be seen in the detailing above the window in the front sitting room. The building remains in its original form with the original clapboard siding beneath the present day aluminium siding. This building was constructed in 1901 by James Wilderspin. Architectural details include a bracketed cornice and shingled roof over the front bay window. 

The porch and decorative brackets has been rebuilt to the replicate the original design. 

The Jepson Duke House’s cultural heritage value lies in its association with its original owner Jepson Duke who fought for the North in the American Civil War as Captain of his regiment known as “Dukes Devils.”

Heritage Attributes  

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of the Jepson Duke House include:

 Two story construction in its original form with an intact stone foundation.

  • Original arched and bracketed bay window at the front of the house
  • Reconstructed veranda built to the original design 

73 Rankin Avenue - Captain Allen House*

Description of Property

Building Name: Captain Allen House

Street Location: 73 Rankin Avenue

Legal Description: Plan 2, Lot 38, Pt Lot 39

County: Essex

Town: Town of Amherstburg

Builder: Peter Henderson

Ownership: Private

Original Owner: Captain Christopher Allen

Original Use: Private Residence

Present Use: Private residence

Date of Construction: 1880

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

The Captain Allen House cultural heritage value is unique in the association with Captain Christopher Allen, a noted Great Lakes shipmaster.  He and his wife Mary (King) lived in the house from 1885 until they moved to Cleveland in 1891.  He then rented the home until it was purchased in 1901 by W.H. Gatfield who continued to rent the property until 1919 when it was sold to Arthur Kemp. 

Heritage Attributes  

The house was built in 1880 by carpenter Peter Henderson as a home for himself and wife Rebecca.  The area was originally part of the garrison grounds of Fort Malden.  Ten acres of the former Ordnance Reserve were purchased in 1866 by Arthur Rankin who laid out a subdivision known as “The Park”, comprised of North Street and Rankin Avenue.  (Source: Amherstburg 1796-1996: The New Town on the Garrison Grounds)

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of the Captain Allen House include:

  • Gothic Revival architecture
  • Gable roof
  • Bracketed bay window
  • Double window with pediment
  • Classic Verandah

 

An example of Gothic Revival architecture, built in 1880 by carpenter Peter Henderson. Features a gabled roof, bracketed bay window and a classic verandah. For many years the home of Captain Christopher Allen, a noted Great Lakes Shipmaster.

67 Richmond Street - Thomas Drug Store

Description of Property

  • Street Location: 65-67 Richmond St.
  • Legal Description: Part Lot 13, West Side of Ramsay Street, Plan 1
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Town of Amherstburg

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

65-67 Richmond Street, built 1885, is representative of smaller-scale, wood-frame commercial-type buildings which were constructed at the time, and which historically contributed to Amherstburg’s commercial core.

The property is valued for contributing to Amhertsburg’s historic commercial activity, and particularly recalls Amherstburg’s status, and its downtown as a thriving commercial centre in the late 19th century; it was built, and operated as a drug store 1885 – 1927.

The property is significant for its association with druggist, Charles M. S. Thomas (1855-1927), who commissioned the building. He was a fixture in the town’s retail sphere and well-known for his service on town council, the school board, civic committees, fraternal and community organizations. He is also remembered for publishing a small newspaper from the building – the Independent – which existed 1883 to c. 1886, advocating temperance, worker’s rights and other issues.

The site has contextual value in helping to define, maintain and support the historical commercial character of the area; it is integral to reinforcing the historic high street status of Richmond Street.  The building is physically, functionally, visually and historically linked to its surroundings being compatible in form, scale, age and use with the other properties in the area.

Heritage Attributes  

The primary heritage attributes (character-defining elements) of the property are its:

  • Original location and placement on Richmond Street;
  • Two-storey, rectangular form, and very low-profile hipped roof;
  • Wood-frame construction and facades;
  • Fenestration and doorways;
  • Wraparound storefront with large display windows, recessed entry and secondary, upper-floor entry with transom lights.

140 Richmond Street - Gibson Gallery*

Description of Property

  • Building Name: Gibson Gallery
  • Street Location: 140 Richmond St.
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: Canadian Southern Railroad
  • Ownership: Fort Malden Guild of Arts and Crafts
  • Original Owner: Canadian Southern Railroad          
  • Present Use: Art Gallery and Museum    
  • Date of Construction: 1892 (despite claims of 1896)

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

The Gibson Gallery is a one-storey red brick building approximately 72 feet in length and 27 feet wide. It is Romanesque in style. The building was built in 1892 as a Railroad Station when the Michigan Central Railroad was extended into Amherstburg from Gordon Station. Features include bevelled glass panes in fanlights above windows and dressed stone sills with decorative trim. Three main divisions are apparent within the building where the tickets were given, baggage was taken, and where individuals would wait for their train. The Amherstburg station was built at a period when the railroad management was giving attention for the first time to architecture and had appointed qualified architects to its staff. Previously small town stations were plain affairs often built of vertical board siding, such as the Gordon Station. Substantially unchanged and restored by Florence Gibson, she donated the building of the Fort Malden Guild of Arts and Crafts who currently own and operate the Gibson Art Gallery.

Heritage Attributes  

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of the Gibson Gallery include:

  • Romanesque style
  • Bevelled glass panes and fan-lights above windows
  • One storey brick building
  • Dressed stone window sills and decorative window trim
  • Three main divisions indoors: waiting room, ticket office, and baggage room

 

Gibson Gallery was built in 1892 as a Railway Station in the Romanesque style. While the building currently functions as an art gallery, the original function is evident in its structure. The three main divisions of the building: waiting room, ticket office, and baggage room are detectable from the interior.

Public - donations appreciated.

259 Richmond Street - Wallace Smith Residence*

Description of Property

  • Building Name: Wallace Smith Residence    
  • Street Location: 259 Richmond Street
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: William Mickle                   
  • Original Owner: Patrick Delmeter   
  • Present Use: Private Residence
  • Date of Construction: 1850

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

The Wallace Smith Residence was constructed in 1850 and was used as boarding house for nuns in association with ST. John the Baptist Roman Catholic Church. The original siding of clapboard has been covered with stucco. On the 9th of December, 1864, Rev. Pierre Laurent, the newly appointed pastor of St. John the Baptist Parish wrote to the Superior General of the Holy Names requesting “three or four sisters to take charge of the Parish school for girls in Amherstburg. The Sisters agreed to come on the condition that the Parish or trustees would supply them with a rented furnished house, pay each teacher $300 a year, that the nuns would not be obliged to build a convent themselves, and that the nuns would be able to open a school for girls as well as a boarding school.”

August 28, 1865, the Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary arrived in Amherstburg to establish the first daughter-house in the province. Sister Marie-Ignace (Superior), Marie Mathilde and Marie Alfred accompanied by Sr. Marie Oliver who had been appointed to oversee this project. They came to Amherstburg in the evening boat and were met at the dock by Mrs. Cunningham and Misses O’Madden who conducted them to the priest's house. They were received by Rev. J.M. Bruyere (Vicar of the General Diocese), Re. P.D. Laurent and his assistant Rev. J. Gelinas. “After a short conversation with the priests they were brought to a small brick house rented for that purpose and were entertained by the misses O’Madden, Bastien, and Semande who had prepared tea and had everything ready for them.” 

Mrs. Petronilla Cunningham bought the property just two months after her husband’s death. A very devout Roman Catholic, the property appealed to her because it was very close to the grounds of St. John the Baptist Parish. As she was only person living in the house, her house was a perfect location to be rented to the Church for housing the nuns who would be running the school. 

Heritage Attributes  

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of the Wallace Smith Residence include:

  • Clapboard siding over brick
  • Stucco exterior later added
  • Small addition porch 

 

Built circa 1850 for Petronilla Cunningham, designated as the 'Wallace Smith Residence'. This house was rented from 1865 to 1867 as a convent for Sisters of the Holy Names.

24 Sandwich Street South - Dr. Manning Residence

Description of Property

  • Building Name: Dr. Manning Residence
  • Street Location: 224 Sandwich St. South
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Original Owner: Unknow
  • Present Use: Private Residence
  • Date of Construction: 1944

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

Design / Physical Value:

Built in 1944, the house is an excellent, representative example of Cape Cod-style design which was popular in the 1930s and 1940s. Reflecting the simplification of design in the 1930s and 1940’s eras, the house is characterized by minimal ornamentation and is instead distinguished by its contrasting stone and brick cladding. The compound plan under an extended-slope roof adds to the visual interest of the design. The plain character of traditional Cape Cod architecture lent itself well to the Depression and Wartime eras when material shortages and restraint were common, which is exemplified in this property. Notably, the stone cladding is flint or chert quarried in the area. A compatible sunroom was added to the rear in 1948.

Contextual Value:

The house is valued for its association with Dr. Frederick William Manning (1881-1966), one of Amherstburg’s foremost doctors, practicing medicine in the Town for 36 years (1930-66). During that period Manning attended to the needs to generations of Amherstburg patients, twenty years of which were from a front office in the house. Manning was also life member of the local Legion, having served as a field doctor in Europe in the First World War, and a Board member of Amherstburg’s Christ Church. 

Heritage Attributes  

Each of the following heritage attributes of the Manning Residence contributes to the design value (Cape Cod style) and the physical value of the property:

  • Existing compound form; one-and one-half-storey height; rear, rectangular, one-storey, gable-roof sunroom addition (1948);
  • Gable roof with extended front slope; gable roof dormers; wood cornices; interior brick chimney;
  • Fenestration with wooden hung-sash and casement sash windows containing multi lights; some glass block foundation windows; wood shutters (stone portion) ; panelled, wood front door; French rear and sunroom doors
  • Reb-brick and stone cladding; cast concrete window sills; concrete block foundation;
  • Sunroom door hood with triangular support brackets
  • Coal chute door in foundation; delivery cabinet with door;
  • Interior fireplace with stone surround and tiled hearth;
  • Complimentary garage of one-storey height with gable roof; red-brick cladding; fenestration with (one) wood-sash multi-pane windows; wood, glazed and panelled side door; and
  • Soft landscaping of the front and rear years.

 

232 Sandwich Street South - Amherstburg Public Library

Description of Property

  • Building Name: Amherstburg Public (Carnegie) Library                                  
  • Street Location: 232 Sandwich St. South                  
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: Crane & Pennington (Architects)
  • Ownership: Town of Amherstburg
  • Owner Address: 271 Sandwich St. S., N9V 2A5
  • Original Owner: Unknown
  • Present Use: Public Library                      
  • Date of Construction: 1913

Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

The need for a public library was recognized early in Amherstburg’s history. Each effort made by the citizenry gave way to bigger and better ideas. The first attempt came in the form of the Mechanics Institute in 1863. There have no record of how long the Institute survived, but it is known that it was followed by the young man’s debating society. In the year 1900, Dr. Joseph Boyle, a physician retired from practice in the State of New York and residing in Malden, made a generous gift to the Town. This came in the form of a cash donation of $3,200 and a sizeable collection of Canadian Historical and Biographical Books. The Town merchants agreed to give a subscription each year for the upkeep of the Library. During this time in the 1900s, the Library was located in the Park building on Dalhousie Street between Gore and Murray (February 1901) and remained there until the present Library was complete. 

When the American House Hotel burned to the ground in 1895 the space that it had occupied was later to become the home of the new Carnegie Library. The Hotel was situated on the southwest corner of Richmond and Apsley Street now commonly referred to as Sandwich Street. Andrew Carnegie agreed to a grant of $10,000 for the building of the Library, but only after much correspondence between himself and Mr. John Legatt, the Town Clerk. Mr. Carnegie was determined that certain standards be adhered to before granting any money. A condition was imposed that the Town would spend 1/10 the amount of the grant each year for upkeep of the Library. 

The architects selected by Council were Crane and Pennington from Windsor who were careful to submit plans in a style that had previously met approval by Carnegie at other locations. This accounts for the design to include what has come to be known as the “Carnegie Stairs,” “Carnegie Basements” that were half below grade, and the nearly ever-present stone ledge that runs around the building at grade level and at the level of the top of the stairs. The similarity to other buildings was offset by the use of limestone for the entire building. Few libraries in Ontario were made of completely stone. 

The stone in this building is of local historic significance as it was quarried from the old Huron Indian Quarry in Anderdon Township. At the turn of the century, the Huron Indians that remained at the Anderdon Reserve treatied off remaining lands. Most received Crown Grants for their properties. Chief Jas. White received a grant for the stone quarry. Later it was sold to the Solvay Corporation from Detroit. The Solvay Corporation was parent to the present Allied Chemical Company. 

Josheph B. Wilson and his brother, sons of a local pensioner were hired as building contractors. Both men were stone masons. The building was started in 1911 and completed in 1913. The total cost of the project was $9,500 which was $500 under budget. 

In 1913 the Library had 600 books specializing in Canadian Historical and Biographical works. In 1935 Ontario Library Inspector F.C. Jennings stated in his report that the Amherstburg Library was one of the most complete and up to date in the county. 

After many years of operating with major accessibility and parking issues, the Amherstburg Library and surrounding area was renovated to include a small addition equipped with an accessibility elevator in 2002. In 2006, a lot next to the Library was paved by the Town of Amherstburg to provide parking access to visitors, downtown shoppers, and Library patrons. 

Heritage Attributes  

Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of The Amherstburg Library include:

  • Eclectic Style: composed of many classical features
  • Limestone construction with smooth stone bands at corners, stone sills, parapets
  • Stone chimney on the west wall
  • Half below grade basement constructed of rubble stone set in mortar joints where every 2 feet are 1”x 3” continuous levelling boards.
  • The interior is plaster over wood lathing
  • High ceilings with rosette
  • Prominent engraved stone parapet with the letters “Public Library” at main entrance

 

The Public Library, financed by Andrew Carnegie and completed in 1913, was built from limestone extracted from the quarry in Anderdon Township. The elevator on the south side was added in recent years.

Today, still operates as the Essex County Library Amherstburg Branch.

Public

129 Simcoe Street - St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church

Description of Property

  • Building Name: St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church                      
  • Street Location: 129 Simcoe St.
  • County: Essex
  • Town: Amherstburg
  • Builder: Unknown
  • Ownership: St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church
  • Owner Address: 239 Alma St., Amherstburg, N9V 1A6
  • Original Owner: Presbyterian Church
  • Present Use: Place of Worship
  • Date of Construction: 1846   

 Statement of Cultural Heritage Value of Interest

The St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, built in 1846, dominated the village of Amherstburg from its location when two roads meet. It is the oldest Presbyterian Church in Upper Canada. At the time of it’s origin in 1828, St. Andrew’s was the farthest west mission field of the Church of Scotland in Canada. Amherstburg was then a thriving commercial centre and a chief point of interest for a steadily mounting stream of immigrants from the “Old Country.” With the assistance of a government grant for the support of Clergy, the Presbyterians in Amherstburg were able to persuade the Rev. Alexander Gale to undertake the work of a beginning a church. Gale remained in Amherstburg for three years, until an attack of malaria forced him to leave in 1831. 

Gale was succeeded by the Rev. George Cheyne who was ordained in Scotland. It was under his guidance that the Presbyterians acquired their first congregational home on Bathurst St. In Congregational records, a pew stewards plan of the church notes once familiar Amherstburg family names: Kemp, Hackett, Cousins, McGee, Elliot, Duff, and the Hon. James Gordon. 

The present house of worship, which has stood on the corner of Simcoe and Bathurst for over a 150 years was built in 1846. Built by the public subscription and thorough material and labour contributed by members of the congregation, the church is a simple frame construction with oak timbers taken from the Botsford homestead. The second home of the Presbyterians has been well taken care of over the years, to which the women of the congregation have played an important role. A record of the 1870s indicated that the women saw to the cleaning of the church and maintenance of the “Lams and Candles.” 

In 1882, the Church was renovated and new pews installed, the old equipment disposed of to the Baptist Congregation. In 1924, the congregation remodel the Church to its present form. The front entrance was turned a quarter to the side facing Bathhurst Street, and the building was aided and placed upon a basement foundation. Stained glass windows were installed as memorials. The old clapboard siding was succeed over and a pipe organ, which would have been regarded in the early days of the church as an inappropriate means of praising God, was received and donated. 

In the 1950s St. Andrew’s after a decade an a half in association with the congregation in Windsor, became, once again, the pictorial charge. The manse on Laird Avenue was built under the watchful eye of Captain Charles Hackett. In 1953, the Rev. Douglas Conlan was called to St. Andrew’s and the Christian Education Building was built and opened in November 1958. No major alterations were made to the church, although it is now sided in aluminium to complement the most recent addition. St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church has stood on the corer of Simcoe and Bath hurts streets with its basic form preserved for years. In May 1978 the Congregation celebrated its 150th anniversary. 

Heritage Attributes 

 Key exterior attributes that embody the heritage value of St. Andrew’s Church include:

  • Oak timber and frame construction with stucco over clapboard siding on exterior
  • Gothic windows with stained glass and plain wood surround and slip sill
  • Gable roof wit boxed cornices, plain, with returns and frieze
  • A notable feature is the classical columned portico porch with a gable roof with a straight stair